Cannabis lawOn Tuesday, we wrote that Jeff Sessions’ confirmation hearing had begun, for the post of U.S. Attorney General. In that piece, we expressed our hope that one of the committee members would “drill down from civil rights to marijuana legalization, and specifically, to enforcement of the Federal Controlled Substances Act.” The hearing concluded yesterday and no one did exactly that. No one turned the screws.

Still, Sessions fielded questions from a few different Senators related to marijuana and the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Below is a close reading on Sessions’ pot-related testimony, beginning with the opening question, when Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT) asked if Sessions would use federal resources to prosecute sick people using marijuana in accordance with state law. Sessions responded: “I won’t commit to never enforcing federal law, Senator Leahy, but absolutely it is a problem of resources for the federal government….”

This comment is interesting in a few respects. First, and unfortunately, Sessions keeps all options on the table as to CSA enforcement. As we have mentioned, that could mean suing states to block implementation of state marijuana programs, or, more narrowly, wielding the CSA’s asset forfeiture provisions against specific cannabis businesses and related parties. That probably sounds ominous, but two years ago, current Attorney General Loretta Lynch said this (in response to a question by Sessions himself, at her own confirmation hearing): “I can tell you that not only do I not support the legalization of marijuana, it is not the position of the Department of Justice currently to support the legalization. Nor would it be the position should I become confirmed as attorney general.”

We all know that states have largely proceeded with impunity on cannabis during Lynch’s tenure, even though the country had far less state-sanctioned pot activity than it does today. Sessions’ reservation about “never enforc[ing] federal law” seems benign by comparison. Regarding the second part of Sessions’ quote, and the “problem of resources for the federal government,” he concedes a key point: even if it were the Trump administration’s number one goal to eradicate state level marijuana, there are likely too many people involved and too much money to revert to the past.

In the hearing on Tuesday, Sessions continued by discussing the Cole memo and the factors considered by the current administration regarding prosecution of state-level marijuana programs:

The Department of Justice under Lynch and Holder set forth some policies that they thought were appropriate to define what cases should be prosecuted in states that have legalized, at least in some fashion marijuana, some parts of marijuana…. But, fundamentally the criticism I think was legitimate is that [the policies] may not have been followed. Using good judgment about how to handle these cases will be a responsibility of mine. I know it won’t be an easy decision, but I will try to do my duty in a fair and just way.

Again, Sessions leaves open the possibility of enforcing federal cannabis prohibition. His talk of “using good judgment about how to handle these cases” is a euphemism for using prosecutorial discretion, something he misleadingly claimed he didn’t have in a subsequent response to Sen. Mike Lee (R-UT):

One obvious concern is the United States Congress has made the possession [of marijuana] in every state and distribution an illegal act. If that’s something that’s not desired any longer, Congress should pass a law to change the rule. It is not so much the attorney general’s job to decide what laws to enforce. We should do our job as effectively as we’re able.

Here Sessions appears to have forgotten his earlier reference to prosecutorial discretion. His disingenuous argument that “my hands would be tied” by Congress, compelling enforcement action, should not be taken seriously – especially because Congress has sheltered state level medical programs for the past few years, and is likely to do so again. Sessions’ point, however, that Congress should pass a law if it permanently wants to prohibit federal enforcement actions, is probably a fair one, and only reinforces the need for us to secure federal legalization of cannabis.

In all, the hearing could have been better, could have been worse. Sessions was far less retrograde in his statements toward marijuana than he has been in the past. He played his cards closely, as nominees are wont to do, and — like it or not — he is going to be confirmed. This means cannabis operators will simply have to wait and see, which has been the name of the game for a while now.

 

 

 

  • Jeff Carroll

    Nice post Vince. To me, the key quote is ” absolutely it is a problem of resources for the federal government”. Obviously he would love to have Congress add clarity so that he doesn’t have to make a tough decision on how to enforce, but it seems like any substantial congressional action would be a few years out at a minimum. They’ll have to choose their battles because of resource constraints in the interim, and this battle seems like a foolish one to pick out of all of the candidates.