Utah and MarijuanaThis is proving to be a big year for cannabis. As a result, we are ranking the fifty states from worst to best on how they treat cannabis and those who consume it. Each of our State of Cannabis posts will analyze one state and our final post will crown the best state for cannabis. As is always the case, but particularly so with this series, we welcome your comments. We are now reaching the point in our series where the states we are listing are not laughably (or should we say screamingly) bad, nor are they good. They are generally okay in some areas and bad (without being horrible) in others. Today we turn to number 30: Utah. 

Continue Reading State of Cannabis: Utah Underperforms on Marijuana

Marijuana Advocacy

As Canada Prime Minister Trudeau points out, the prohibition of marijuana has not only prohibited its use, it has also prohibited research, regulation, and education. As we wrote a couple weekends ago, the decades of marijuana prohibition in the United States has hindered the progress of research and has withheld cannabis from people whose health could truly benefit from it. In addition, the stigmatization that goes along with prohibition has kept education about marijuana away from the public. As we’ve mentioned more than once, legalization leads to regulation, which in turn keeps cannabis in the hands of those who can legally use it. Without good regulation, poor choices and unsafe environments can arise, which benefits no one. Only complete legalization can help us to — in the words of Prime Minister Trudeau — control and regulate it, and to develop research and education that would be beneficial to all.

Cannabis Zoning
Tim Hettler, http://bit.ly/25q8G74

Jon Murray, a reporter for the Denver Post, had an article in Politico magazine salaciously titled The Marijuana Industry’s War on the Poor. Despite the title, the article contained relatively straight-forward reporting on the impacts marijuana businesses can have on certain communities. Denver has many marijuana facilities — 210 stores that sell medical or recreational marijuana, 63 that both grow it and sell it at retail, and 211 standalone grow operations. Many of the grow centers are located in poor and heavily minority sections of town. This density of demand and its location in only certain areas of the city has two major community impacts: odor impacts and higher rents.  Continue Reading The Marijuana Industry is not at War with the Poor

One of our cannabis lawyers, Hilary Bricken, recently did a TEDx talk on the development of “Big Marijuana.” The overall theme of this Ted session was the “Potential in Polarity,” and/or the “Best of Both Worlds.” Given these two themes, my talk focused on whether state-legal marijuana is helping to create “Big Marijuana.” For those of you who don’t want to spend 18 minutes watching the presentation, this post summarizes her talk. For those who want to see a truly compelling talk, the video can be found below.  Continue Reading Is State-Legal Marijuana Creating “Big Marijuana”?

Washington State CannabisLast week, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board (“WSLCB”) very quietly adopted a proposed rule that will allow out of state individuals and entities to finance marijuana businesses within Washington State. Sort of.

In Out-of-State Investment in Washington’s Marijuana Market, we wrote how many cannabis industry stakeholders wrongly believed the WSLCB had already adopted new out of state financing rules and that those rules would allow out of staters to invest in and own Washington marijuana businesses. That was not the case when we wrote that post and it is not the case now either.  Continue Reading Washington State Will Allow for Out of State Cannabis Financing (Sort Of)

Oregon Marijuana Event

The Canna Law Group will be hosting a webinar tomorrow (May 25) on Oregon Marijuana for Investors, from 11 a.m.- 2 p.m. PST.

Oregon is the only state that does NOT have residency requirements for owners and investors in the Oregon marijuana industry. This means Oregon’s recreational and medical cannabis markets are open to out-of-state and even international individuals and companies. This webinar is intended for non-Oregon residents looking to do cannabis business in the state of Oregon and for Oregon businesses looking to take on investment from non-Oregon residents. This webinar will be geared both to those looking to start in the cannabis industry and to those looking to expand their existing cannabis business,

Oregon Canna Law Group attorneys Vincent Sliwoski and Robert McVay, along with Canna Law Group chair Hilary Bricken, will spend three hours covering the structure of the Oregon marijuana industry, what to look for in a partner, and the nuts and bolts of investing in an Oregon cannabis business. The seminar will then have an ample question and answer period at the end.

You can purchase tickets through Eventbrite for $60. Canna Law Group gear (a really cool coffee mug and pen) will be available with the “Canna Swag” ticket option.

If you have any further questions please contact Madeline at 206-224-5657 or at firm@harrismoure.com.

We hope to “see” you there, but hurry because time is running out.

Cannabis CrowdfundingMost cannabis businesses are small businesses. Many of them need money. Some of them have access to capital. And all of them are subject to fundraising laws.

We build out canna (and non-canna) deals regularly in Oregon, Washington, California and elsewhere. Though some of our clients are publicly traded, the majority are closely held businesses that raise money from third parties. Funds may be sought from friends and family, or from accredited investors. (Under the SEC rules, an “accredited investor” is a high net worth individual with less need for the protection provided by most government filings. Sometimes these investors are referred to as venture capitalists, angels or sharks.)  Continue Reading Cannabis Crowdfunding Is Here

Marijuana Delivery Laws in Washington State
It is not wise (or even legal) to deliver cannabis in Washington State.

Washington State prohibits marijuana vape and consumption lounges and most marijuana tourism. And contrary to popular belief, it also clearly prohibits cannabis deliveries to consumers. Though Washington State now has a third-party transporter license so other cannabis licensees do not have to transport product themselves, it still does not have any state-legal delivery services from retailers to consumers.

Washington State has always had a large number of illegal marijuana delivery services. That is likely to change soon though if the City of Seattle gets its way.  Continue Reading Marijuana Delivery in Washington State: Still Very Much Illegal

South CarolinaThis is proving to be a big year for cannabis. As a result, we are ranking the fifty states from worst to best on how they treat cannabis and those who consume it. Each of our State of Cannabis posts will analyze one state and our final post will crown the best state for cannabis. As is always the case, but particularly so with this series, we welcome your comments. We are now reaching the point in our series where the states we are listing are not laughably (or should we say screamingly) bad, nor are they good. They are generally okay in some areas and bad (without being horrible) in others. Today we turn to number 31: South Carolina.  Continue Reading State of Cannabis: South Carolina

Indiana MarijuanaNot sure how Pence can claim to be acting in his constituents’ interest when the majority of Americans now support cannabis legalization, when recreational cannabis states like Colorado and Washington are able to use cannabis tax dollars to help fund schools and to aid the homeless, and when evidence supporting the benefits of using cannabis for medicine continue to mount. When Governor Pence talks about the “interest of our people,” one has to wonder whether he is really talking about just his small coterie who directly benefit from his remaining in power.

Causing us to again ask: who really benefits from cannabis prohibition? The profits made by pharmaceutical companies (Go here for a long and impressive list of those based in Indiana) should immediately come to mind, as does the racist “War on Drugs” in a state not all that long ago dominated by the Klan.

And as for “the youth,” a rather exhaustive study has shown that legalization does not increase cannabis use by young people. And that only makes sense. If you want to reduce usage of something by those under 21 you legalize and regulate it.

Put that in your pipe and smoke it, Governor Pence.