California Cannabis Taxes
California Cannabis Taxes: taxes on taxes

California’s Medicinal and Adult Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MAUCRSA) will make dramatic changes to cannabis taxation in California in the following ways.

Marijuana Excise Tax (Effective January 1, 2018). MAUCRSA changes the structure of California’s Marijuana Excise Tax. Under prior law, a 15% excise tax was imposed on the gross receipts of any retail sale by a dispensary or other person required to be licensed to sell marijuana and marijuana products directly.

In contrast, MAUCRSA imposes a 15% excise tax on “the average market price” of any retail sale by a cannabis retailer. Potentially, there are two average market prices. The first is based on good faith negotiation in the open market, in which case the average-market-price is wholesale cost plus a mark-up determined every six months by the  California State Board of Equalization. The second is based on a “non-arm’s length transaction,” in which case, the average market price is the gross receipt from the sale.  Ignoring the irony that the good faith arms-length negotiation includes a mark-up determined by the Equalization Board, this distinction is crucial in determining how the tax is collected and remitted. Though the cannabis consumer is ultimately subject to the Marijuana Excise Tax, it is the Distributor that must collect the Tax from the Retailer and, in turn, remit the funds to the Equalization Board.

For “arms-length” transactions, the Distributor must collect the tax from the retailer “on or before 90 days after … the sale [from the distributor] to the retailer.” For non arm’s length transactions, the Distributor must collect the tax from the retailer when the retailer sells cannabis product to the consumer, but in no event more than 90 days after the Distributor’s sale to the Retailer.

The Marijuana Excise Tax is in addition to sales and use taxes imposed by California’s state and local governments and it is included in gross receipts for purposes of computing sales/use tax. This essentially creates a tax on a tax.

Cultivation Excise Tax (Effective January 1, 2018).  Under MAUCRSA, California’s Cultivation Excise Tax will be imposed on the cultivator after the cannabis is harvested and enters the commercial market. For cannabis flower, the tax is $9.25 per ounce. For Cannabis leaves, the tax is $2.75 per ounce. The Equalization Board has the authority to create a tax stamp/tax container system whereby proof of tax payment is evidenced by either a stamp or a pre-approved container.

The Cultivation Excise Tax is collected on the “first sale or transfer” of cannabis by the cultivator to the manufacture. What constitutes a first sale is not defined in the statutes. For a transfer of cannabis product to a distributor, this tax is collected when the cannabis “enters the commercial market.” When Cannabis “enters the commercial market” is defined as the time when the cannabis or cannabis product has completed all required inspection and testing. The cultivator is subject to the Cultivation Excise Tax, but is relieved of that burden so long as a manufacture or distributor provides detailed documentation. Under MAUCRSA, the Equalization Board has the authority to prescribe a substitute method and manner for collecting and paying the Cultivation Excise Tax and it is likely the collection and payment process will be fine-tuned.

Finally, a county may impose a tax on the privilege of engaging in a wide variety of cannabis activities, including cultivating, manufacturing and sales. Under MAUCRSA, counties have some latitude to structure their tax including: the tax rate, method of apportionment, and manner of collection. The county tax may be imposed in addition to the various other local ordinances taxing cannabis.

Anyone who knows California knows it is serious about tax collection in general and MAUCRSA’s treatment of cannabis excise taxes is no exception. Strict record-keeping and compliance is going to be essential for all participants in California’s cannabis market.

  • Jeff Cohen

    Wondering why they are placing the obligation with the distributor to collect the sales tax, and not the retailer who is familiar with the normal reporting of sales and future excise taxes..? Is it too understate the ave. market price to reduce the negative impact of adding 15% sales tax to the sale price? (like property taxes using undervalued home values..) Has the BoE actually recognized that 34% total added tax to cannabis is going to keep the Black mkts strong and are looking to reduce the impact of these inflated taxes..??