Cannabis ContractsOur cannabis clients often face the chicken and egg problem of trying to balance three or four decisions contingent on one another. A classic example is a new marijuana business licensee that wants the state agency to approve a certain location, wants a landlord to execute a lease for that location, and wants an investor to contribute capital to pay for equipment and build-out at that location. The state agency will only approve the location when it has a signed lease in front of it. The landlord will only execute the lease if a state license has already been approved and if the business is properly capitalized. The cannabis business does not want to be on the hook for executing the lease until it knows it has a good source of capital and that the land will be approved by the state for its cannabis business. And the investor will only put money into the cannabis business if there is confirmation the property works and the business has a lease.

Basically, everything is contingent on everything else. It can be a challenging situation for cannabis business owners, but there is a simple solution more companies should use — standard conditional agreements with agreed-upon closing periods. Anyone who has bought a home understands how closing works. You sign a purchase agreement, but you have 30 days to get inspections done to make sure the home has clear title and is adequately constructed. If there are any problems, you can walk away, less your earnest money.

The same structure can be used in startup cannabis business deals. So long as landlords get some earnest money up front, they are generally willing to execute commercial leases that allow tenant cancellation if the state does not approve the cannabis license or if the tenant discovers its cannabis business is not feasible at any point during the first few months of the lease. Similarly, cannabis investment contracts can and should be similarly conditioned. A loan agreement or an equity purchase agreement involving a cannabis business can have any time frame for closing, which can be defined as actually funding the investment or as the moment when the investor is fully obligated to pay the investment over time. Generally, the conditions will be that the company passes some standard due diligence, but it makes sense for the licensing and real estate portions to be added as additional closing conditions.

Using multiple conditional agreements, a cannabis business can ensure everything is aligned before obligations to pay money mature. And if things fall apart, the various conditions will not be met and everyone can walk away with minimum pain. When doing cannabis deals, it is important to think through the various facts that need to be in place before obligations start maturing. If you do this, you will be better able to walk the tight rope that heavily-regulated cannabis businesses on a timeline face during the cannabis licensing process.