oregon marijuana equal pay

Back in 2017, the Oregon legislature passed equal pay legislation prohibiting employers from asking applicants about compensation history. The law is known as the Equal Pay Act. This law, like other employment laws, applies to cannabis businesses. The equal pay provision of the law goes into effect on January 1, 2019. Oregon Bureau of Labor and Industries (BOLI) was tasked with drafting rules implementing the Equal Pay Act and recently released draft rules. This series of posts will unpack the new rules and explain the impacts on your cannabis business.

The Equal Pay Act prohibits employers from paying disparate compensation for work of a comparable character. The Equal Pay Act defines compensation as “wages, salary, bonuses, benefits, fringe benefits and equity-based compensation.” What this means is each of these taken in total is an employee’s compensation. The proposed BOLI rules provide clarification to each of the words that make up “compensation.”

BOLI defines benefits as:

“the rate of contribution that an employee makes irrevocably to a trustee or to a third person under a plan, fund or program; or the rate of costs to the employer in providing benefits to an employee beyond what is required by federal, state or local law pursuant to an enforceable commitment to carry out a financially responsible plan or program which is committed to the employee affected including but not limited to the following: medical or hospital care; pensions on retirement or death; compensation for injuries or illness resulting from occupational activity; insurance to provide any of [the above]; unemployment benefits; life insurance; disability insurance; sick leave pay; accident insurance; vacation or holiday pay; or defraying costs of other bona fide fringe benefits.”

But what does this long-winded definition actually mean? As an example, if you have two extraction technicians that perform substantially the same work, you need to provide them the same benefits, otherwise you will be in violation of the equal pay laws. If you provide one health insurance, you need to provide the other the same level of health insurance. Etc.

Bonus, similarly has been given a long definition. Bonus is defined as:

“an amount that is paid or something of monetary or quantifiable value that is given to an employee by an employer in addition to the employee’s regular rate of pay, typically as a means of encouragement or in recognition of superior performance. Bonuses include but are not limited to the following: signing or job acceptance bonuses; attendance bonuses; loyalty bonuses; performance bonuses; and productivity bonuses.”

Again, if you provide a performance bonus to one extraction technician, you must provide a bonus on the same terms to any other extraction technician. A future post will discuss in detail exactly what the “same terms” means.

Finally, “salary” is defined as a predetermined amount constituting all or part of the employee’s compensation paid for each pay period of one week or longer. And “wages” means all compensation for performance of service by an employee for an employer. Your extraction technicians need to be receiving the same salary or wages otherwise, you’ll be in violation of the rules.

All of the above definitions need to be considered in total when setting compensation for your employees. Remember–work of a comparable character must be paid the same. And yes, a future post will explore what “comparable character” means.

The Equal Pay portion of the Equal Pay Act officially goes into effect on January 1, 2019. Now is the time to get familiar with the law and its implementing rules, and to ensure you are paying your cannabis employees in accordance with the requirements. If you are unsure, consult an attorney to review your pay practices. Non-compliance will come with hefty fines.