marijuana cannabis oregon initiative
The goal of your ballot initiative is to get to a vote.

Oregon successfully legalized the use, sale, processing, and production of recreational marijuana in 2014 through the initiative process. The initiative process is a method of direct democracy that allows people to propose laws outside of the normal legislative process. Oregon’s marijuana statute (ORS 475B) allows cities and counties to “opt-out” of commercial recreational marijuana. In other words, cities and counties do not have to allow for the sale, processing, or producing of marijuana within their jurisdictional borders. ORS 475B, as originally written, allowed cities and counties to automatically opt-out if registered voters in the jurisdiction voted at least 55% against the legalization. All other cities or counties could either create reasonable time, place, and manner restrictions for marijuana businesses or could put up an opt-out vote to the public at the next general election.

Many cities and counties chose to opt-out from legalized recreational marijuana. In these jurisdictions, citizens can still use and possess marijuana, but licensed recreational businesses are not allowed to operate in jurisdictions that opted-out. Still, citizens can use the initiative process to change these local laws. The initiative process allows for citizens to propose a city or county ordinance allowing Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) licensed marijuana businesses within the jurisdiction. We have expertise in navigating this process and we are, in fact, running one initiative in an “opt out” jurisdiction right now.

The initiative process, much like many forms of our government, is overly complicated with a host of rules and technical requirements. It requires a lot of steps, careful planning, patience, and organization. Once an entrepreneur decides he or she wants to change the laws, the initiative process starts by filing a prospective petition with the local elections official. The prospective petition includes the language of the proposed ordinance. The language is an opportunity to develop a local ordinance that fulfills your goals and the citizens goals for licensed marijuana businesses.

After the prospective petition is submitted, the city or county will approve it for circulation. This is when the real work starts. Initiative petitions are not automatically guaranteed a spot on the ballot. Instead, initiative petitions must gather the support of the public to be included on the next election’s ballot. Almost all of us have been accosted by a circulator on the MAX or downtown in Portland asking if we are a registered voter and if we’ll sign the petition sheet to get a measure on the ballot. City initiative petitions require valid signatures from 15% of the registered voters in the city and County initiative petitions require 8% of registered voters.

If the local elections official determines enough valid signatures were received, the initiative will be referred to the local governing body. The local governing body has the option to adopt the petition without sending it to the ballot. They can also choose to allow the petition to be voted on in the next election. If it makes it onto the ballot, the initiative must receive a majority of approval from the voters to pass. If it receives a majority of votes, the initiative will be enacted as law.

Initiative petitions are one way to attempt to change local laws surrounding marijuana businesses. These petitions can be drafted in favor of their drafters, who may attempt to set themselves up for success once an initiative passes. Over the past few years, some citizens in Oregon have attempted and failed, while others have successfully changed local law to allow for recreational marijuana licensees. The process is long and complex, but the upside can be tremendous.