California Cannabis hearings
Attend your local california cannabis hearings

One of the first questions clients usually ask our California cannabis lawyers is “where can I operate or expand my cannabis business?” That is because even though Californians voted for the Adult Use of Marijuana Act (a/k/a AUMA or Prop 64) California counties and cities are free to enact their own restrictions on cannabis businesses operating within their jurisdiction.

If you’ve been reading our California Cannabis Countdown series you know that to get a California State cannabis license you first need a license from your local city or county. Further complicating things is that prior to enactment of the Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act of 2015 (MCRSA), many cannabis businesses were operating in an unregulated gray market or with tacit approval from their local government because few jurisdictions had their own medical cannabis ordinances and permitting processes in place. When the MCRSA and AUMA passed, most local jurisdictions created their own licensing processes so as to be able to receive a portion of California’s cannabis licensing fees and taxes.

Last week I spoke to the Marin County Bar Association on cannabis ordinances in Marin County and its municipalities. Except for Fairfax, the rest of Marin is generally not friendly towards medical cannabis. If you’re asking why I’m not talking about adult-use cannabis it’s because you’ve got to crawl before you can walk and Marin’s still figuring out how to crawl when it comes to cannabis. Both Marin County and its cities are still contemplating whether to allow medical cannabis; adult use cannabis is most likely quite some time away.

When a California city or county is trying to decide whether to allow cannabis businesses within their jurisdiction, the first thing they do is hold public hearings, with notice of the hearing made online or in the local paper. If your local government has a relevant listserv, I recommend you sign up as that’s the easiest way to stay informed. Our California cannabis attorneys regularly attend public hearings to advocate for our clients and for the cannabis industry and here is our top five list of what you should do if you would like to see your jurisdiction adopt reasonable/favorable cannabis regulations:

  1. Show up. You know the old saying about how 80% of life is showing up? Well, if you want your local jurisdiction to adopt reasonable cannabis regulations you need to show up to these hearings and voice your support – in large numbers.
  2. Be reasonable. Talk to your neighbors and local businesses. Maybe you’ll find out that a dispensary will be heavily opposed but the community is open to manufacturing, testing, and deliveries.
  3. Know your facts. Your local councilman or supervisor probably has a full-time job; most are volunteers with family obligations and work deadlines. They don’t have time to delve into the weeds (pun intended) of the cannabis industry. They want to be informed so let them know what they can expect in tax revenue. How about crime statistics in similar localities? What percentage of local residents voted for Prop 64? They probably don’t have this information so provide it to them. Help them so they can help you.
  4. Parking and traffic. Besides parking garage owners, no one likes a shortage of public parking. If you’re hoping your jurisdiction adopts a dispensary ordinance make sure you address parking and traffic.
  5. SHOW UP! I mention it twice because it’s that important. Time and time again, we’ve seen local legislators get cold feet because naysayers show up to public hearings in full force while proponents stay at home. You need to be there to balance the scales.

The California state agencies that will issue licenses (Bureau of Cannabis Control, Department of Food and Agriculture, and Department of Public Health) can only do so if your local jurisdiction allows it. Don’t take for granted that your local legislators will allow cannabis businesses in your town. Activism has been a hallmark of the cannabis industry for a long time and if you want to see cannabis businesses (either medical or adult-use) in your jurisdiction of choice, it could very well be up to you to help achieve that.