Oregon cannabis lawAs the marijuana industry grows and consolidates, marijuana businesses are forced to consider more complex business structures to meet their business needs. Such business structures must reduce costs, increase operating efficiency, and most importantly, strictly comply with federal and state law.

One strategy for cannabis retailers, especially those with multiple outlets, is to establish an employee leasing company. If the retailer has three stores, for example, each organized as an LLC, its owners may organize a fourth LLC to lease employees to the stores. This leasing company will then contract with, and act as paymaster for, each store LLC. In this arrangement, the employees who work at each store LLC are not store employees; rather, they are leased employees who receive their W2s from the leasing company. Accordingly, the employee leasing company is solely liable for employment tax.

Employee leasing companies offer two key benefits: consolidation of costs and employee retention. Without the leasing company, each retailer in the example above is required to manage the compliance costs of accounting, employment taxes, workman’s compensation, and medical benefits. By consolidating these functions, the employee leasing company should be able to reduce these compliance costs.

Employee leasing companies also benefit employees by making the marijuana retailer a more attractive employer. As leasing company employees, they receive their W2s from a non-cannabis company, it may be easier for them to sign leases, acquire mortgages and take on other formal obligations. In addition, the consolidated purchasing power of the employee leasing company should provide more robust employee benefits at a lower price.

State law on employee leasing companies varies considerably. Some states scarcely address the concept; others regulate extensively. A good example of the latter is Oregon. In Oregon, employee leasing companies must be licensed by the state’s Workers Compensation Division. The completed application is detailed, takes a few months to process, and entails a $2,050 licensing fee (paid every two years). Once licensed, the leasing company is jointly responsible for the hiring company’s entire workforce—including non-leased employees—which requires special procedures and insurance.

In a payroll leasing arrangement, the leasing LLC will have service agreements with each store LLC. Such agreements must reflect an arm’s-length market rate. Many methods are used to determine an arm’s length market rate but all are based on the facts and circumstances of your business. One common methodology is “Cost-Plus.” In a Cost-Plus arrangement, the employee leasing company compiles its costs and adds an arm’s-length market profit. The IRS carefully examines on audit, arm’s-length charges between affiliated entities.

Finally, employee leasing companies cannot be used as a device to avoid taxes, circumvent the correct application of Code §280E, or to launder money.

The use and benefits of an employee leasing company are not limited to retailers; producers, processors, and manufactures may also benefit from using an employee leasing company. But before you establish an employee leasing company for your cannabis business(es), it is critical you have an operational strategy in place and reasonable projections of the costs. It is even more critical that you understand 280E and structure your entities to comply fully with that. Only after having done all this will you be in a good position to evaluate whether an employee leasing company is best for your cannabis business.

  • Everyone that would like to get into the business of making money from marijuana sale legally should have the opportunity. A very smart move in the right direction.