About a year ago, we were the first law firm to report on the legality of manufactured cannabidiol (“CBD”)-infused alcoholic beverages. Due to the growing popularity and mainstream nature of CBD-infused products, many alcohol beverage companies were surprised to read us conclude that blending CBD into their products was a risky business, even in hemp-friendly

According to recent reports, the hemp-derived cannabidiol (“Hemp-CBD”) market is expected to grow by 700 percent by 2020 and grow to $2.1 billion by 2020. Given this significant growth forecast, sensitive business information (also known as trade secrets) has become an incredibly valuable asset for Hemp-CBD stakeholders. Realizing value from those trade secrets requires sharing

If you are an eccentric person like me and follow the Oregon Department of Agriculture (“ODA”) on Twitter and have a deep interest in international business (especially the trade war with China), you will have noticed that ODA recently (and proudly) posted something that I see as both positive and negative for the hemp industry:

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This is the first in a three-part series addressing why companies making and sell hemp-derived CBD products ought to be concerned about state consumer protection laws and offering a few thoughts on how to mitigate the risk of running afoul of those laws. This week we will look at Oregon, followed by Washington, and California.

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Early last week, we covered Governor Brown’s Executive Order No. 19-09 ordering a ban of flavored vaping products. That ban is six months in duration, and it covers all flavored tobacco and nicotine vaping products, as well as marijuana products flavored with non-marijuana terpenes. As expected, the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) and Oregon Health

oregon vape ban olccOn Friday, Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued Executive Order No. 19-09 (the “Order”), which directs the Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) and the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to “take immediate action to address the vaping public health crisis.” In one sense, the Order is narrower than many people feared and expected: specifically, it bans