Home grown cannabis lawsAs cannabis reform has spread across the United States, it has given birth to a marketplace increasingly driven by business interests. This is the fourth installment in our series looking at how the changing landscape of cannabis policy affects a key group of often-overlooked stakeholders: medical marijuana patients who choose to cultivate their own supply

New York and MarijuanaThis is proving to be a big year for cannabis. As a result, we are ranking the fifty states from worst to best on how they treat cannabis and those who consume it. Each of our State of Cannabis posts will analyze one state and our final post will crown the best state for cannabis. As is always the case, but particularly so with this series, we welcome your comments. We have finally crossed the half-way point. The states featured going forward generally have mixed laws when it comes to cannabis. Some good, some bad, and some ugly. Today we turn to number 24: New York.

Our previous rankings are as follows: 25. Wisconsin; 26. Arizona; 27. West Virginia; 28. Indiana; 29. North Carolina; 30. Utah;  31. South Carolina; 32. Tennessee; 33. North Dakota; 34.Georgia; 35. Louisiana; 36. Mississippi; 37. Nebraska; 38. Missouri; 39. Florida; 40. Arkansas; 41. Montana; 42. Iowa; 43. Virginia; 44. Wyoming; 45. Texas;  46. Kansas;  47. Alabama;  48. Idaho; 49. Oklahoma;  50. South Dakota.


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The cannabis industry must avoid giving fodder for a book like this.
The cannabis industry must avoid giving fodder for a book like this.

Noelle Crombie of the Oregonian blows the lid off Oregon’s lack of any real testing or standards for its medical marijuana products. In her series, “A Tainted High,” Ms. Crombie calls into question the safety of cannabis

On October 28, 2014, the United States Department of Justice issued a “Policy Statement Regarding Marijuana Issues in Indian Country.” In this memo, the DOJ stated that its eight enforcement priorities will apply “in the event that sovereign Indian Nations seek to legalize the cultivation or use of marijuana in Indian Country.” At

By Ryan Malkin*

Decades of arresting marijuana users has “failed to prevent” its use, “created a violent, illegal drug market,” and “disproportionately impacted African-American and Latino communities,” notes New York Senate Bill S01747, filed January 14, 2015. The New York “marijuana regulation and taxation act” was introduced by senators Krueger, Dilan, Hoylman, Montgomery, and Rivera.