Minnesota and marijuanaThis is proving to be a big year for cannabis. As a result, we are ranking the fifty states from worst to best on how they treat cannabis and those who consume it. Each of our State of Cannabis posts will analyze one state and our final post will crown the best state for cannabis. As is always the case, but particularly so with this series, we welcome your comments. We have finally crossed the half-way point. The states featured going forward generally have mixed laws when it comes to cannabis. Some good, some bad, and some ugly. Today we turn to number 23: Minnesota.

Our previous rankings are as follows: 24. New York; 25. Wisconsin; 26. Arizona; 27. West Virginia; 28. Indiana; 29. North Carolina; 30. Utah;  31. South Carolina; 32. Tennessee; 33. North Dakota; 34.Georgia; 35. Louisiana; 36. Mississippi; 37. Nebraska; 38. Missouri; 39. Florida; 40. Arkansas; 41. Montana; 42. Iowa; 43. Virginia; 44. Wyoming; 45. Texas;  46. Kansas;  47. Alabama;  48. Idaho; 49. Oklahoma;  50. South Dakota.


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The cannabis industry must avoid giving fodder for a book like this.
The cannabis industry must avoid giving fodder for a book like this.

Noelle Crombie of the Oregonian blows the lid off Oregon’s lack of any real testing or standards for its medical marijuana products. In her series, “A Tainted High,” Ms. Crombie calls into question the safety of cannabis

On October 28, 2014, the United States Department of Justice issued a “Policy Statement Regarding Marijuana Issues in Indian Country.” In this memo, the DOJ stated that its eight enforcement priorities will apply “in the event that sovereign Indian Nations seek to legalize the cultivation or use of marijuana in Indian Country.” At

A Seattle church located in uber-hip Capitol Hill (Mt. Calvary Christian Center) is protesting against Uncle Ike’s, a state licensed cannabis retailer that has opened up shop next door. The church’s lead pastor claims that a cannabis retailer located within 1,000 feet of his church is “an indictment of where our society has come.”

Minnesota is moving quickly to provide limited access to medical marijuana. Marijuana legalization is generally a slow process, with most states taking a couple of years to go from legalization to having product available for purchase. Yet Minnesota this week announced that it plans to make it possible for medical marijuana patients to be able