L.A. Phase 3 marijuanaIn case you missed it, at the end of last month, the City of L.A. finally decided on what to do with Phase 3 cannabis licensing regarding retail and retail delivery (see here and here for the City’s newest ordinances). In addition, City Council instructed the Department of Cannabis Regulation (“DCR”) to begin the pre-vetting

cannabis mergers and acquisitions marijuanaIt’s no secret that multiple state-by-state operators are building their cannabis empires through aggressive mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”). Last year, our cannabis business attorneys closed more than $100 million in cannabis company acquisitions, and that shows no signs of stopping in 2019. Cannabis M&A is not your run-of-the-mill business dealing though, and working from boilerplate,

los angeles cannabis licensing tier IIIThis past weekend was the hallowed 4/20 holiday for those who celebrate and participate. Prior to 4/20, the City of L.A. made some progressive moves towards bolstering consumer protection in the City concerting illegal cannabis (see this pretty great interactive map for your legal cannabis providers in City borders) and rounding out (legally speaking) the

mexico marijuana cannabis

We are committed to keeping our knowledge of international cannabis news current, and as legalized cannabis has become an international reality, our lawyers in Spain and in China are naturally seeing more of this work. Zozayacorrea Sahagún Arizaga, a leading law firm based in Guadalajara, Mexico, gave Harris Bricken the express permission to provide our own English summary along with the original Spanish article.

Mexico’s New Cannabis Laws

Cannabis legalization and regulation in Mexico is imminent.

Late last year, the current Secretary of Government, Olga Sánchez Cordero, presented a legislative proposal to issue the General Law for the Regulation and Control of Cannabis (“The Cannabis Bill”).

The Cannabis Bill would regulate the growing, cultivating, harvesting, producing, transforming, labeling, packaging, advertising, transporting, distributing, selling, marketing, carrying and consuming of cannabis products and its derivatives for personal, scientific and commercial purposes.

In other words, it would regulate pretty much everything.

The Cannabis Bill also proposes creating the Mexican Institute for Regulation and Control of Cannabis (“IMRCC”) to regulate, monitor, sanction, and concentrate registration of cannabis producers and to establish guidelines for cannabis consumption in public spaces. The IMRCC would have the power to issue cannabis licenses and renewable permits for between 5 and 10 years.

In addition to legalizing cannabis production for personal use via production cooperatives, the Cannabis Bill would also set up the following four commercial cannabis categories:

  1. Therapeutic or Herbal Use: Licensed businesses will be allowed to plant, cultivate, harvest, prepare, produce, process, transport, distribute and sell cannabis and its derivatives for therapeutic purposes. This would not require medical authorization or supervision.
  2. Pharmaceutical Use: This commercial cannabis category would allow sowing, cultivating, harvesting, preparing, producing, processing, transporting, distributing and selling cannabis and its derivatives for pharmaceutical purposes. Sale of cannabis and cannabis-derivative products under this category would require a medical prescription with purchase through a licensed pharmacy in compliance with Mexico’s General Health Law.
  3. Adult Use: Businesses licensed under this category would be able to sow, cultivate, harvest, prepare, produce, process, transport, distribute and sell cannabis to adults. Public consumption of cannabis by adults would be regulated the same as tobacco. The sale of cannabis and its derivatives under this category must be made in authorized establishments, which may only market cannabis, derived products and related items. Cannabis sold under this category will be regulated in its amount of tetrahydrocannabinol (“THC”) levels and will require have strict warning and labeling requirements.
  4. Industrial Use: Cannabis businesses licensed under this category will be permitted to sow, cultivate, harvest, prepare, manufacture, produce, distribute and sell cannabis for industrial purposes.

Businesses applying for licenses under all four of the above categories would need to comply with several legal requirements, including reinforcing the legal age of possession and consumption at 18, and not having been convicted of a “high social impact” crime, money laundering or for organized crime.
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