Cannabis edibles and the FDA
The FDA is the 800 pound gorilla of cannabis edibles.

The Food & Drug Administration (FDA) has only the jurisdiction Congress gave it in the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act (FDCA). Under this act, the FDA has broad regulatory powers over legal drugs, with more limited powers over food.

Under the FDCA, the FDA categorizes a substance as either a food or a drug depending on how it is labeled or advertised. If labeling suggests the substance is “intended for use in the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of disease, or is an “article[]” (other than food) intended to affect the structure or any function of the body of man or other animals,” the FDA will regulate it as a drug (except as noted below).

Cannabis edibles should stay out of the drug category if possible because drugs are subject to a comprehensive regulatory scheme that controls every part of the process, including formulation, testing for safety and efficacy, pre-clearance, manufacturing, labeling, sales, and recalls. For drug firms, the FDA is the 800-pound gorilla in the room.

The FDA categorizes food as anything people ingest that is not a drug. The FDA’s role in food is essentially hands-off. Though the FDA has promulgated hundreds of pages of food regulations, it mostly relies on food makers to self-enforce these regulations. However, when the FDA learns of regulatory violations it can and will take action.

The food/drug distinction is not always clear. In the Dietary Supplement Health & Education Act (DSHEA), Congress permitted some labeling claims for food (including dietary supplements) formerly limited to drugs. Under DSHEA, the FDA has issued regulations allowing certain specific health claims to be made on foods, e.g., “Three grams of soluble fiber from oatmeal daily in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease.” Food makers can also ask the FDA to permit other health claims if supported by scientific evidence. Other claims may be made, e.g., the role of an ingredient intended to affect a structure or function of the human body, under certain limited circumstances.

What does all of this mean for makers of cannabis edibles? If your cannabis label or your advertising does not make claims that bring your product within the FDA’s drug definition, the FDA will not treat your edible as a drug under the FDCA Act. This does not make it federally legal of course; it just means you won’t have to spend time having to deal with the FDA.

What if your edibles are marked with health claims or structure/function claims under DSHEA for cannabis or cannabis components, e.g., THC or CBDs? The FDA has in the past sent warning letters to firms making claims like these:

  • Studies have found CBD to possess the following medical properties: … Antipsychotic – combats psychosis disorders…combats neurodegenerative disorders … Anti-tumoral – combats tumor and cancer cells …combats…depression disorders
  • CBD helps with cancer, multiple sclerosis …diabetes, arthritis, dystonia, Crohn’s disease
  • Treats rheumatoid arthritis

The FDA has said that: “It is important to note that these products are not approved by FDA for the diagnosis, cure, mitigation, treatment, or prevention of any disease. Consumers should beware purchasing and using any such products.” If you make any health claims regulated by FDA for cannabis edibles, you risk federal administrative enforcement action.

For more on what the FDA has done with marijuana, check out the following:

There may though be change on the horizon. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb recently said that “It’s high time [pun intended?] to start looking at rules around the [cannabis] plant, which some states have legalized for medicinal or recreational use.” Gottlieb also predicted that “We’ll have some answers to this question very soon because I think we do bear some responsibility to start to address these questions.”

 

Stay tuned.