california alameda marin marijuana
Alameda and Marin Counties are moving ahead, slowly.

Our offices in San Francisco and Los Angeles constantly get calls from entrepreneurs looking to launch or expand their cannabis businesses. By far, one of the most challenging aspects for any attorney advising clients in the cannabis industry is staying up to date on all the developments in the Golden State’s 58 counties and 482 cities. And although it’s a daunting task, we work hard to stay on top o things.

Avid readers of our California Cannabis Countdown series are well aware of the ever-changing cannabis regulatory landscape at the local level. Every week there are a number of Board of Supervisors or City Council hearings throughout the state where cannabis-related rules and ordinances are enacted and amended. We are constantly advising our clients about any changes in the cannabis ordinances of the local jurisdictions of interest.

It’s this constant flux of change at the local legislative level that brings me to today’s topic: an update on the counties of Alameda and Marin. We last covered Alameda here and Marin here.

Let’s start with Alameda County. The County passed its most recent cannabis ordinance last September (with some minor amendments since then). That ordinance created a medical cannabis pilot program that authorized up to three dispensaries, and up to four mixed-light and two indoor cultivation permits. The County’s Cannabis Interdepartmental Work Group (“Work Group”) has taken direction from the Planning Department and has proposed to amend their cannabis ordinance to include the following:

  • Authorize adult-use cannabis activities;
  • Allow for up to five dispensaries;
  • Allow for up to ten cultivation permits (only in the East County);
  • Remove cultivation from a pilot program to a permanent use; and
  • Establish a permit fee structure (the fees are quite significant so if the County is serious about bringing operators into the legal market they will hopefully lower the proposed fees).

The Board of Supervisors will meet this Wednesday to discuss these amendments as well as determine whether the County should allow for manufacturing, distribution, and testing. The County has also expressed an interest in the recently released emergency regulations by the Department of Public Health in regard to Type S manufacturing licenses, which we covered here. If you’d like to see Alameda expand the types of cannabis activities it is willing to authorize, showing up is paramount.

As for Marin County, it is still moving at a deliberate pace– some might call it too deliberate. After the County rejected all applications for medical dispensaries, its cannabis ordinance was amended to only authorize medical delivery-only services: Adult-use cannabis activities are still some ways away in Marin County. The County hopes to begin accepting applications this month but that might be overly ambitious. Marin’s delivery-only ordinance only authorizes up to four delivery licenses and applications will be graded on a 100 point scale: Business plan (20 points), operating plan (50 points), and public benefits plan (30 points). Today at 2 p.m., the Board of Supervisors will hold a briefing to discuss the following items:

  • The medicinal cannabis license application;
  • The license application submittal guide (which provides guidance on what to include in your business, operating, and public benefits plan);
  • The owner submittal form;
  • The owner submittal form guide; and
  • The financial information form.

Although these are steps in the right direction, both Marin and Alameda can still make more progress. At the very least both counties should be open to testing laboratories and non-volatile manufacturing. Marin, with nearly 70% of its residents voting in favor of the Adult-Use of Marijuana Act (Prop 64), needs to stop dragging its feet when it comes to allowing adult-use. The slow and restrictive pace of cannabis legislation at the local level is one of the biggest impediments to cannabis operators entering the regulated market. Let’s applaud Marin and Alameda for making progress, but let’s also reach out to our local officials to let them know they can also do better. There are two great opportunities to let them know in person this week.