California cannabis rulesAt a Sacramento conference I attended last week, a panel of California’s cannabis regulators discussed the status of the state’s new cannabis laws under the Medicinal and Adult Use Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (“MAUCRSA” a/k/a SB 94) that aim to reconcile California’s 2015 Medical Cannabis Regulation and Safety Act (MCRSA) and the 2016 Adult Use of Marijuana Act. MAUCRSA comes on the heels of a comprehensive set of proposed MCRSA regulations (see here, here, herehere, and here) and a slew of pubic hearings and commentary on those proposed rules. According to regulators, they are now incorporating public comments as well as MAUCRSA into their efforts to finalize the licensing rules before licenses begin to issue in January 2018.

Here are some of the potential changes to the MAUCRSA regulations discussed at Monday’s panel:

  1. The MCRSA proposed rules will be withdrawn in full, and new MAUCRSA rules will likely come in the fall that cover both medicinal and adult use. Some regulations likely will change from their current MCRSA form, but what likely won’t change is the license application requirements, and the state expects to begin issuing temporary licenses in early December for applicants with prior local approval. The temporary licenses will be good for only four months, though, and these licensees will still have to go through the full application process.
  2. Based on public feedback received to date, the regulators expect some cultivation rules to change, including the definitions for “mixed light,” “indoor,” “outdoor,” and “owner.” Also, the requirement for 42% renewable source energy for indoor grows will likely be revised to define exactly what qualifies as a renewable source and to potentially alter the percentage mandated, though it is unclear whether that would increase or decrease.
  3. MAUCRSA allows individuals to hold both medicinal and adult use licenses but only if there are located at “separate and distinct” premises. The MAUCRSA regulations will aim to clarify what “separate and distinct” means, and regulators on the panel didn’t seem to want a strict interpretation of that term so as to require entirely separate parcels, but instead discussed the possibility of allowing “physical barriers” of some sort between separately licensed medicinal and recreational activities.
  4. Under California’s existing Compassionate Use Act, medical cannabis operators have utilized mostly non-profit mutual benefit corporations as the preferred corporate form for compliance. What MAUCRSA doesn’t do is explicitly clarify how these non-profits might transition to for-profit companies without jeopardizing their licenses or prior local approval or triggering regulator scrutiny. The regulators acknowledged that this omission in MAUCRSA may foreclose specific regulation on the subject until further “cleanup” legislation is handed down from the legislature.

Though the public comment period on the MCRSA proposed rules has already passed, regulators stressed that they welcome further feedback from cannabis industry stakeholders ahead of their releasing proposed MAUCRSA regulations in the fall. They made clear that public input is an essential element of making sure California “gets it right” on developing and regulating a successful and safe recreational and medical cannabis industry.

To help you better understand what MAUCRSA means for your cannabis business, three of our California attorneys will be hosting a free webinar on August 8, 2017 from 12 pm to 1 pm PT. Los Angeles-based Hilary Bricken will moderate two of our San Francisco-based attorneys (Alison Malsbury and Habib Bentaleb) in a discussion on the major changes between the MCRSA and MAUCRSA, including touching on vertical integration and ownership of multiple licenses, revised distributorship standards, and what California cannabis license applicants can expect more generally from California’s Bureau of Cannabis Control as rule-making continues through the remainder of the year. They will also address questions from the audience both during and at the end of the webinar.

To register for this free webinar, please click here. We look forward to your joining us!