California cannabis financing

For cannabis companies in California, 2017 is a period when neither companies nor investors are living in the moment. In addition to all of the risk factors cannabis investors need to heed, everyone is planning for future uncertainty because of  the recent passage of MAUCRSA. The state is currently working on MAUCRSA regulations, and local governments are changing policies with what seems like every public hearing – not to mention comments from our federal leadership that seem tailor-made for cooling investment into cannabis companies (the job creators!).

At the same time, California cannabis companies need funding now to scale up their operations in anticipation of future licensure under MAUCRSA and to appease local regulators through local licensing and permitting processes. The result of all this is that our California cannabis lawyers are seeing and working on many deals involving hybrid financing structures – an element of cash investment now, and warrants, options, and convertible debt later. Each has different triggers and rights for the cannabis company and investors, but all are in essence a different form of “kicking the can down the road” to 2018.

Three big factors are driving hybridized financing in The Golden State:

1. Regulatory Uncertainty and Red Tape.

Investors inherently accept risk in any investment, but they do not enjoy reading the tea leaves on major issues that are out of the control of company and investor – any of which could pose an existential threat to their entire investment. This means investors are searching for creative ways to mitigate these risks, and risks abound in cannabis regulations that change pretty much all the time. Many cannabis investors are uncertain whether they want to cross the 20% ownership threshold to be considered an “owner” under MAUCRSA, which ultimately requires they be disclosed to and heavily vetted by California state regulators.

2. License Transfer and Corporate Structuring Issues.

California’s draft cannabis business regulations make clear that future licenses are not transferable. And many local governments are also making sure cannabis operators cannot transfer their permits or local licenses after-the-fact. Further, most existing medical cannabis operators are organized as non-profit entities pursuant to Proposition 215, and there’s an outstanding question as to whether these entities will be able to merge into for-profits once they have their state licenses under MAUCRSA, though such a move could potentially jeopardize state and local licensure altogether. Though all parties should undertake their cannabis financings with this knowledge, investors understandably still want to reduce risk by withholding some of their investment until 2018 when more of these questions will likely have been resolved by state and local governments.

3. The Size of the Opportunity.

In the last two weeks, we’ve seen the situation in Nevada where despite a 33-37% tax on all retail sales, dispensaries simply cannot keep up with demand and are selling out of supply. In the event California has a similar supply crunch, we are seeing investors in California cannabis cultivators seeking warrants or options as a “kicker” for additional upside – more equity in the event the opportunities prove even greater than anticipated.

This is not to say that investors are dictating all terms in the world of cannabis finance. Cannabis companies, too, can and do negotiate for control of the trigger points or adjustments to the future exercise price (or regulatory triggers). Some cannabis companies are choosing hybrid investment structures because they, too, want to feel out the size of the opportunities and many believe they will be able to demand much greater valuations and investment terms in 2018, once the initial dust settles on the regulatory sphere.

What are you seeing out there by way of California cannabis funding?