Alameda cannabis lawyersCalifornia has 58 counties and 482 incorporated cities across the state, each with the option to create its own rules or ban marijuana altogether. In this California Cannabis Countdown series, we cover who is banning cannabis, who is waiting to see what to with cannabis, and who is embracing California’s change to legalize marijuana — permits, regulations, taxes and all. For each city and county, we’ll discuss its location, history with cannabis, current law, and proposed law to give you a clearer picture of where to locate your California cannabis business, how to keep it legal, and what you will and won’t be allowed to do.

Our last California Cannabis Countdown post was on Oakland and before that San FranciscoSonoma County, the City of Davis, the City of Santa RosaCounty and City of San BernardinoMarin CountyNevada County, the City of Lynwood, the City of CoachellaLos Angeles County, the City of Los Angeles, the City of Desert Hot SpringsSonoma County, the City of Sacramento, the City of BerkeleyCalaveras CountyMonterey County and the City of Emeryville.

Today’s post is on Alameda County.

Welcome to the California Cannabis Countdown.

Location.  Alameda County is the 7th most populous county in the state of California. Its county seat is in Oakland and it occupies much of the East Bay region. It’s home to the Alameda County Fair and the Alameda County Fairgrounds, which can boast to being the home of the oldest one-mile horse racing track in America. Hope that tidbit comes in handy on trivia night.

History with Cannabis and Current Cannabis Laws. Back in 2005, Alameda County (this post is addressing only Alameda County and not the City of Alameda) began regulating cannabis by passing a medical cannabis dispensary ordinance. Though we’re always happy to see cities and counties embrace cannabis businesses with sensible and reasonable regulations, Alameda’s first foray should be described as a very timid one. Alameda’s ordinance only addressed medical cannabis dispensaries and it capped the number of dispensary licenses at three and it also limited the amount of cannabis a dispensary could keep on its premises.

With friendlier regulations in Oakland, Berkeley, Richmond, and Emeryville, this first ordinance put Alameda at a competitive disadvantage with potential cannabis businesses when compared to those cities. With the passage of the Medical Cannabis Regulation Safety Act (MCRSA), Alameda County (along with a number of other California jurisdictions) decided it was time to amend their cannabis ordinance. In June of 2016, the Alameda County Community Development Agency and the Castro Valley Municipal Advisory Council held a meeting to begin the process of updating Alameda’s cannabis ordinance. If you’ve ever followed a cannabis ordinance as it winds its way through your local jurisdiction you are well aware that after one meeting comes many others – supervisor meetings, planning commission meetings, citizen advisory committee meetings, and interdepartmental working group meetings, just to name a few. Like Gremlins, the meetings just continue to multiply. Let me not be too harsh on Alameda because slow progress is better than no progress and definitely better than these alternatives.

Proposed Cannabis Laws: On August 1, 2017, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors conducted the first reading of its proposed amendments to their cannabis ordinance and on September 12th of this year (we like to keep you up to date here on the Canna Law Blog) the Board held a second reading of their cannabis ordinance. Here’s a list of the some of the highlights of Alameda’s cannabis ordinance:

  • Increases the number of dispensaries allowed from three to five.
  • Allows delivery of medical cannabis from permitted dispensaries within the county and from outside jurisdictions from 9:00am to 9:00pm.
  • Allows the sale, distribution, and delivery of edibles.
  • Removes the 100-pound limit on the amount of cannabis that can be stored by a dispensary on its premises.
  • Implements a two-year pilot program authorizing medical cannabis cultivation. This pilot program will authorize up to six cultivation permits – up to two indoor cultivation operations and four mixed-light operations. Outdoor cultivation is prohibited.
  • Nurseries may be permitted where cultivation is permitted.
  • Cultivation sites will have to be at least one thousand feet from any pre-K to 12th grade school, licensed child or day care facility, public park or playground, drug or alcohol recovery facility or public recreation center.

Although the caps imposed on medical cannabis dispensaries and cultivators will limit the innovation, investment, and tax revenue generated by Alameda County cannabis businesses, this is still a step in the right direction and we should not let perfect be the enemy of the good. We’re also optimistic that Alameda County will continue on its path towards increased legalization – perhaps with fewer meetings next time.