Marijuana lawIf you hadn’t noticed, the federal government was set to shut down on Friday due to lack of funding. Thankfully, our House and Senate representatives reached a tentative deal yesterday morning to avoid that. Better still, the budget deal extends the Rohrbacher-Farr Amendment provisions, which prohibit the U.S. Department of Justice from spending money to interfere with implementation of state medical marijuana laws. The legislation should pass later this week.

The new medical cannabis rider will likely be referred to as the Rohrbacher-Blumenauer amendment, or something similar, as Earl Blumenauer (D.-OR) has replaced outgoing house member Sam Farr as a co-sponsor of the rider. Here is the rider’s current proposed language:

SEC. 537. None of the funds made available in this Act to the Department of Justice may be used, with respect to any of the States of Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming, or with respect to the District of Columbia, Guam, or Puerto Rico, to prevent any of them from implementing their own laws that authorize the use, distribution, possession, or cultivation of medical marijuana.

By our count, that’s 44 states, plus D.C., Guam and Puerto Rico. For some reason, at least two states with new medical cannabis laws are left out. Those states include North Dakota, where voters approved a medical marijuana ballot initiative in November, and Indiana, whose governor signed a restrictive CBD medical cannabis bill into law late last week. Hopefully these omissions were just an oversight and North Dakota and Indiana make the final cut.

The FY2017 budget deal also extends protection of state industrial hemp programs from federal interference, and prevents Washington, D.C. from spending its own money to tax and regulate marijuana sales. An overview prepared by House Democratic Appropriations Committee members noted that the bill does not, however, include language protecting banks from penalties for working with state-legal marijuana businesses, which some in Congress had pushed for.

Like everything else in the spending bill, Section 537 is not a permanent solution of any sort – it merely kicks the can down the road until September 30, when FY2017 ends. Section 537 also is not the long-term fix medical (and adult use) cannabis businesses need, especially in the era of Jeff Sessions and a brutal executive branch.

Looking ahead, we do know from conversations with Rep. Blumenauer’s office that FY2018 legislation being drafted by lawmakers includes extension of the helpful Section 537 language. We also know that most of President Trump’s large proposed cuts take place in the FY2018 budget, and that his cuts do not include Rohrbacher-Blumenauer– at least for now.

But this is where it gets tricky. If medical marijuana safeguards are not present in the FY2018 House proposal, supporters will have to push for amendment on the House floor or in the Senate Appropriations Committee. That’s a tough slog, because House leadership has begun to restrict the scope of policy riders allowed to come to the floor. Last summer, for example, proposed amendments on banking services for marijuana businesses, and on Washington, D.C.’s ability to spend money regulating cannabis, were blocked from floor consideration altogether.

Note that over the past few years, Rohrbacher-Farr has withstood DOJ challenges and garnered a significant uptick in support. In 2014, the measure was approved in the House by a relatively narrow vote of 219-189. In 2015, the approval margin grew to 242-186. Since the last House floor vote, several more states have enacted medical or adult use cannabis laws, and a number of prohibitionists who opposed those measures have been replaced with freshman supporters.

Today, cannabis reformers are confident that if they can get an FY2018 amendment to a House vote, it will easily pass again. It also appears likely that advocates have the votes to pass a broader amendment protecting all state marijuana laws from federal interference — including those allowing recreational use. A measure along those lines came just nine votes short of passing on the House floor in 2015.

Why Congress won’t just change the law, rather than restricting its enforcement, is a question for another day. For now, though, medical marijuana businesses can breathe a bit more easily, at least until September 30.

  • Rick01234

    So that would exceed the 2/3 rule to amend the prohibition of this currently prohibited substance, so it’s the Fed against the will of the people which can not be resisted, it’s pointless now and they know it.

    I think we are enjoying the pointlessness of it all.

    • justathought

      they are just trying to figure out how divvy up that cannabis industry pie at this point.

  • buds.

    They need to do more.