Representative Blumenauer provides a great overview here on the current political climate regarding opioids and cannabis. The Trump Administration claims to be working on solutions for the opioid crisis but seems too blinded by the stigma of cannabis to consider it as a viable solution. Research increasingly shows cannabis is at least a partial solution for opioid addiction, but the federal government remains immovable on cannabis.

We have to keep pushing until the politicians get on board.

Things were not perfect for the cannabis industry under the Obama Administration and Eric Holder and the Cole Memo (to which Holder is referring above), but they certainly were better than Jeff Sessions’ odd and obsessive loathing of cannabis.

But instead of our getting all nostalgic, we just need to keep fighting. The populace and the numbers are on our side and we will win in the end. You agree, right?

Republican Senator Gardner makes a good point. The small amount of research the federal government has permitted has shown many ways cannabis is medically useful, yet barriers to research continue. Gardner is one of several senators who support the Marijuana Effective Drug Studies (MEDS) Act to remove barriers to cannabis research.

It would be helpful for everyone. It’s simple and it’s necessary. Knowledge is power, especially when it comes to medicine and health.

Cannabis for opiumDr. Oz is correct to describe the status of medical marijuana in this country as hypocrisy. The Trump administration claims to want to fix the opioid epidemic and yet they refuse to loosen their grip on cannabis laws even just enough to permit further research. One need not support full cannabis legalization to support scientific research on cannabis; one simply needs to respect the opinions of over half the citizens of the country and the scientific data that already exists.

So, does the federal government really want to exhaust all possibilities to try to solve the opioid epidemic? It sure doesn’t seem like it.

California Cannabis SeminarPlease join us this Thursday, September 28th for the California Cannabis Investment Forum in Downtown San Francisco!

Our San Francisco office is hosting this event with fiscal sponsorship from Templar Capital Management and GBDS and associate sponsorship from the NCIA. This Forum will bring together top investors and leading companies in California’s cannabis industry and provide you with the information you need for investing in California’s cannabis space.

Hilary Bricken, who heads up our Los Angeles office. will begin the event with a short talk on the many recent changes to California’s medical and adult use cannabis laws. Carlton Willey, who heads up our firm’s finance group out of San Francisco, will then moderate a panel comprised of early and late stage investors and debt and equity financers with experience in California’s cannabis industry. The following panelists will discuss cannabis industry investing, deal structures, cannabis business concerns in the context of investing, investor red flags in the cannabis industry, and various other matters of increasing importance in the California cannabis investment world:

Allen Gold, Principal at Templar Capital Management

Alejandro Di Tolla, CEO of GBDS

Sherri Haskell, CEO of CannaAngels

Tom DiGiovanni, CFO of Canndescent

Emily Paxhia, Managing Director of Poseidon Asset Management

The California Cannabis Investment Forum will be at Covo Event Space in Downtown San Francisco. Doors will open at 5:45 pm and Hilary’s keynote will begin at 6:15. Hors-d’oeuvres and drinks will be served and a cocktail networking session will take place following the panel discussion.

We look forward to seeing you there, but do NOT delay in buying your tickets. We must cap attendance at 250 and we are very rapidly nearing that number already.

Cannabis lawUtah Republican Senator Orrin Hatch proves again that seeing value in cannabis regulation is not a partisan issue. As he points out, the federal government’s lack of support for states’ rights and cannabis regulation hangs the states out to dry and leaves cannabis users without proper information on safety, dosing, and quality. Instead, the federal government continues to carry out practices that are out of date and, as Hatch says, do more harm than good.

It’s time for the federal government to step out of the way and let the states lead.

D’Amato is right, of course, and he is not the first to say this. Attorney General Jeff Sessions cannot rid himself of his anti-pot prejudices even though his holding on to them directly contradicts his previously held position supporting states’ rights. Supporting states rights means you believe the states (not the federal government) should decide on things like cannabis legalization, whether you like those decisions or not.

D’Amato’s quote highlights how cannabis is not a partisan issue as he belongs to the same political party as does Sessions. Methinks one of these two politicians is a hypocrite when it comes to pot. Can you guess which one?

 

California Cannabis

Representative Rohrabacher couldn’t be more right. It is destructive to have a government allegedly striving to solve the opioid crisis and yet at every turn tries to deny the usefulness of medical marijuana in accomplishing this. More than half the states have legalized medical cannabis and many have decriminalized or legalized recreational cannabis and this demonstrates that the opinion of Americans is changing about cannabis. The people see its medicinal and economic value and are asking for change, yet the current administration has rejected the requests of the people and denied the science behind cannabis’ efficacy as medicine, and all because of paranoid propaganda.

Legalization is where we’re heading, whether our government likes it or not.

 

On Thursday, September 28th, our San Francisco office will host an event on investing in California’s newly regulated cannabis industry. Sponsored by the  Templar, GBDS, and the NCIA, the California Cannabis Investment Forum will bring together top investors and leading companies in California’s cannabis industry and its related technologies.

Hilary Bricken of our Los Angeles office will begin the Forum at 6:15 p.m. with a short keynote addressing the recent (and many) changes to California’s medical and adult use cannabis laws. Then from 6:45 p.m. to 8 p.m., Carlton Willey of our San Francisco office will moderate a panel comprised of the following early and late stage investors and debt and equity financers with experience in California’s cannabis industry:

Allen Gold, Principal at Templar Capital Management

Alejandro Di Tolla, CEO of GBDS and a leading angel investor in cannabis businesses

Sherri Haskell, Founder and CEO of CannaAngels

Tom DiGiovanni, CFO of Canndescent

Emily Paxhia, Managing Director of Poseidon Asset Management

Panelists will cover cannabis industry investing, deal structures, cannabis business concerns in the context of investing, and investor red flags in the cannabis industry, as well as matters of increasing importance in the cannabis investment world as we head into 2018 and California’s expected $8 billion legalized cannabis marketplace. Audience questions will be taken during the entirety of the panel discussion and if you’d like to submit a question to the panel beforehand, please write us at firm@harrisbricken.com.

The California Cannabis Investment Forum will be held at Covo Event Space in Downtown San Francisco. Hors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served. Doors open at 5:45 p.m., and a cocktail networking session will commence from 8-9:30 p.m.

To purchase a ticket for this event, please go here. The early bird rate lasts until September 12, so act fast!

This week, Kevin Sabet, the leader of the anti-pot propaganda group Smart Approaches to Marijuana, stated the above regarding Cory Booker’s Marijuana Justice Act (“MJA”). The MJA would both end federal cannabis prohibition and require the federal government to punish states that continue to arrest minorities for cannabis crimes at disproportionate rates by withholding money for jails, prisons, and other projects.

Does that sound like a remake of “big tobacco” to you? And how will this bill aid big canna in a way that other measures would not? Is the cannabis industry really headed toward a “big tobacco” model? Is commercialization inherently wrong, especially if it helps bring about legislation that requires expunging criminal records and removing criminal penalties? For a higly entertaining and insightful take on big canna, check out this YouTube video.