culver city california cannabis marijuana
Adult use cannabis stores, coming soon.

On December 11, 2017, Culver City Council voted to approve an ordinance that allows for the establishment of medicinal and recreational commercial cannabis businesses. Culver City becomes the fourth city in Los Angeles (including West Hollywood, Los Angeles, and Maywood) to implement a framework for regulating both medical and adult-use cannabis.

Since January 1 and the legalization of adult-use cannabis in California, clients have been asking us constantly about licensing their businesses. As we have explained time and again, getting local approval is paramount before getting a state license.

Here is how the rest of Los Angeles County currently looks:

  • The City of Los Angeles is only accepting Prop M Priority Applications until at least March 4, 2018. The city has stated that applications for the general public probably will not be available until mid-2018.
  • West Hollywood has been processing applications, but the city is known for having high rents and minimal property space.
  • Maywood is one of the smallest incorporated cities in Los Angeles County. Although they allow commercial cannabis businesses, there is not a lot of space to establish one.

Culver City expects to have an application process open soon, sometime during the first quarter of 2018. The ordinance allows for the establishment of storefront retail, delivery only retail, manufacturing, distribution, laboratory testing, and indoor commercial cultivation. There will be limits placed on the number of permits issued for each type of business, so it will be important to be ready once the application process opens. The city expects that getting a storefront retail business permit will be competitive.

The ordinance additionally lays out strict standards for business permits. A commercial cannabis business permit is not transferable to other persons, projects, or locations. Businesses will not be able to relocate unless approved by the City Council. The ordinance also sets forth rules for changing ownership and changing the form of the entity. These types of things will be important to get organized before applying for a commercial cannabis business permit in Culver City.

Located in the heart of West LA and easily accessible by many major freeways, Culver City offers a great alternative to those seeking business licenses in the City of Los Angeles. Anyone interested should continue to monitor closely, and be ready to move quickly.

Marijuana Cultivation Los Angeles
It’s no easy calculation in Los Angeles when it comes to cannabis cultivation.

When the City of Los Angeles passed its ordinances allowing commercial cannabis businesses, the City placed limits on the total amount of licenses available in each community for each license category, based on “undue concentration.” The City made it easy to understand the “soft caps” for most of the licensing categories. For each neighborhood’s retailers (Type 10), microbusinesses (Type 12), and manufactures (Type 7) –the ratio is one license per 10,000, 7,500, and 7,500 residents, respectively. The City has even provided the exact number of licenses available on its Commercial Cannabis License Capacity Chart (“License Capacity Chart”), here.

However, the cultivation license limits are more difficult to understand. Here is how the city defines cultivation limits for Undue Concentration:

a ratio of 1 square foot of cultivated area for every 350 square feet of land zoned M1, M2, M3, MR1, and MR2 with a maximum aggregate of 100,000 square feet of cultivated area and a maximum aggregate number of 15 Licenses at a ratio of one License for every 2,500 square feet of allowable cultivated area for Cultivation (Types 1A, 1C, 2A, 3A, 4 and 5A).

After careful examination of this definition, here’s what we think the City means to do with undue concentration and available plant canopy:

On the License Capacity Chart, if you take the Total Square Feet of a given neighborhood and divide that number by 350 square feet, the result is the listed as “Cultivation + Microbusiness (with cultivation)”. For example, Harbor Gateway has 43,982,470 total square feet, which means that Harbor Gateway has about 125,664 total square feet of eligible canopy (43,982,470/350=125,664).

There can also only be 1 license for every 2,500 square feet of allowable cultivated area. Sticking with the Harbor Gateway example, 125,664 eligible square feet divided by 2,500 equals 50 potential licenses, max. However, that number assumes that all licensees will have grows no larger than 2,500 square feet, which probably isn’t the case. To that end, the City informs us that cultivation licenses will be processed on a first come, first serve basis.

The rules also stipulate a maximum of 100,000 square feet and a maximum of 15 licenses, but it is unclear whether these maximums apply to the neighborhood as a whole or to the individual licensee (who could stack up small cultivation licenses to secure 100,000 feet of canopy in aggregate). However, the initial total calculation of the eligible canopy area would be irrelevant for multiple communities if there was a maximum of 100,000 square feet total for that community. Therefore, we can assume that the 100,000 square feet should be applied per individual license, with no one person or entity holding more than 15 cultivation licenses within a given community.

All of that said, the key question remains: How many square feet can I apply for in my application? The ultimate answer is that “it depends.” No matter how much available canopy space there is in a community, the situation depends on factors like how many people apply for cultivation space, how much space each person applies for, how much space the City will grant, etc. We do know that as the City of Los Angeles grants licenses, the Undue Concentration license soft caps will become clearer.

For now, here’s a chart (with approximate numbers) to summarize how many licenses per community we will most likely see:

Community Plan Area

Square Feet of Canopy

Maximum Amount of Licenses (Actual*)

Average Canopy Space**

(sq. ft.)

Arleta – Pacoima

63,309

15 (25)

4,220

Bel Air – Beverly Crest

N/A

0

0

Boyle Heights

97,034

15 (38)

6,468

Brentwood – Pacific Palisades

N/A

0

0

Canoga Park – Winnetka – Woodland Hills – West Hills

22,392

8

2,799

Central City

72,563

15 (29)

4,837

Central City North

98,647

15 (39)

6,576

Chatsworth – Porter Ranch

169,165

15 (67)

11,277

Encino – Tarzana

2,422

1

2,422

Granada Hills – Knollwood

48,254

15 (19)

3,216

Harbor Gateway

125,664

15 (50)

8,377

Hollywood

20,825

8

2,603

LAX

N/A

0

0

Mission Hills – Panorama City – North Hills

38,553

15

2,570

North Hollywood – Valley Village

47,735

15 (19)

3,182

Northeast Los Angeles

100,725

15 (40)

6,715

Northridge

18,331

7

2,618

Palms – Mar Vista – Del Rey

33,528

13

2,579

Port of Los Angeles

N/A

0

0

Reseda – West Van Nuys

127,800

15 (51)

8,520

San Pedro

29,633

11

2,693

Sherman Oaks – Studio City – Toluca Lake – Cahuenga Pass

4,807

1

4,807

Silver Lake – Echo Park – Elysian Valley

3,028

1

3,028

South Los Angeles

16,453

6

2,742

Southeast Los Angeles

168,657

15 (67)

11,243

Sun Valley – La Tuna Canyon

222,321

15 (88)

14,821

Sunland – Tujunga – Lake View Terrace – Shadow Hills – East LA Tuna Canyon

2,291

1

2,291

Sylmar

66,600

15 (26)

4,440

Van Nuys – North Sherman Oaks

62,941

15 (25)

4,196

Venice

4,955

1

4,955

West Adams – Baldwin Hills – Lelmert

13,477

5

2,695

West Los Angeles

26,300

10

2,630

Westchester – Playa del Rey

34,770

13

2,674

Westlake

1,560

1

1,560

Westwood

N/A

0

0

Wilmington – Harbor City

248,428

15 (99)

16,561

Wilshire

4,284

1

4,284

*Actual maximum amount of licenses available if the City does not cap at 15 licenses.

**Average canopy space assumes that City will allow the maximum amount of licenses, and that each applicant will apply for an equal amount of canopy space.

Los Angeles Cannabis Marijuana San FernandoOur Los Angeles cannabis business lawyers, including me, are constantly being asked about the local cannabis laws of the various 88 incorporated cities in Los Angeles County.

Because it is both important and difficult to decipher each individual city’s local laws, we thought it would be helpful to provide you with charts showing the same. We divided the county into four regions, and over the next few weeks we will publish charts for each of these regions to keep you updated on each of the cities and their current laws.

This week’s post highlights the cities located in and around the San Fernando and Antelope Vallesy. Here is a chart showing the laws regarding cannabis cultivation, dispensing, distribution, and manufacturing in those areas.

Before you can receive a California cannabis license (temporary or annual) you must provide the state with proof of local approval. Our charts in this series are intended to help you figure out whether such local approval is possible and, if so, what it takes to get it.  Please note that although we hope find this research useful, local cannabis zoning ordinances tend to change quickly, so you will want to confirm these findings and run related due diligence, prior to taking action.

California Cannabis
Gone in 60 days: L.A. releases its priority marijuana dispensary applications.

On December 31, L.A. established its long-awaited Department of Cannabis Regulation (“DCR”) website. The website details L.A.’s three licensing phases (of which general public processing is in the last category) and an FAQ page about the licensing process.

Today, DCR released applications for priority processing of those qualifying Pre-ICO/Prop. D dispensaries–see here. This means that existing medical marijuana dispensaries (“EMMDs”) in compliance with the city’s limited immunity provisions (i.e. dispensaries that received 2017 L050 BTRCs or that received a BTRC in 2007, registered with the City Clerk by November 13, 2007 (in accordance with the requirements under Interim Control Ordinance 179027), and received a L050 BTRC in 2015 or 2016), and that are current with City taxes are now eligible to apply for temporary approval and a city license to operate under MAUCRSA. Temporary approval is different from actual licensing–it allows the EMMDs to operate with limited immunity while their licensing applications are pending.

Importantly, EMMDs only have 60 days from today to submit their applications, which is not as simple as it sounds. Los Angeles’ license application is very similar to the State of California under the Bureau of Cannabis Control regulations, which means applicants need to be prepared for an information dump to the DCR and Cannabis Regulation Commission in the form of corporate and operational information and plans.

Here are select highlights of what the EMMD license application requires (again, EMMD temporary approval is a different process):

  • General information about the business applicant, including a copy of the articles of incorporation (since most if not all EMMDs are non-profits of some kind).
  • Disclosure of all other licenses, permits or authorization the applicant has received and disclosure of whether the applicant and/or its directors/managers had ever been denied the right to conduct commercial cannabis activity anywhere.
  • Provision of all the same financial information that is required by the state under MAUCRSA. This includes listing all funds belonging to the applicant, all loans made to the applicant, all investments made to the business, and all gifts of any kind given to the applicant for conducting commercial cannabis activity. Furthermore, details like information of money sources, dates of transactions, terms of deal, etc. are also required to be submitted.
  • Proof of the applicant’s legal right to occupy the business premises, which means either providing an affidavit from the landowner or a copy of the title or deed. General information about the property is also required, which can mostly be found in the lease agreement (which is also required to be provided if the property is being leased).
  • Security plans must be submitted that explain the premises’ video surveillance system, access points to the business, description of fire-proof safe and practices for allowing access to limited-access areas of the business. The applicant will also have to provide detailed descriptions for how they will meet standards for track-and-trace, inventory, returns, destruction of products, waste management, environmental sustainability, records retention and operational requirements.
  • A complete and detailed premise diagram is required for submission.
  • Representation that they have received, or are in the process of getting, insurance and/or a bond.
  • A proposed Community Benefits Agreement as required by the DCR.

Most importantly, all applicants, including EMMDs, in addition to a pre-license inspection of the business premises, must submit to a public hearing before the Cannabis Regulation Commission (which is the government body that ultimately determines if the EMMD is licensed) before they can receive their license. Once the DCR determines that an application is complete, applicants must notify all owners and occupants of all property within 500 feet of the property line of the lot where the business is located. All of these folks are entitled to notice that an application has been filed near them, and all of them are entitled to show up at the public hearing.

Getting a license in the City of Los Angeles is not going to be easy (or cheap), but it is necessary for any dispensary to continue to operate under MAUCRSA and  undertake adult use sales. (Only two L.A. County cities have allowed recreational sales so far, so that’s a significant development). Note that any EMMD that does not submit an application within the next 60 days will be stuck in the third-phase general public bucket. That’s not a great place to be: there is still no starting deadline for those applications.

Adult use cannabis is on the way.

Our Los Angeles cannabis lawyers, including me, are constantly being asked about the local cannabis laws of the various 88 incorporated cities in Los Angeles County.

Because it is both important and difficult to decipher each individual city’s local laws, we thought it would be helpful to provide you with charts showing the same. We divided the county into 4 regions, and over the next few weeks we will publish charts for each of these regions to keep you updated on each of the cities and their current laws.

This week’s post highlights the cities located in and around the Long Beach Area. Here is the chart showing the laws regarding cannabis cultivation, dispensing, distribution, and manufacturing in the Long Beach Area Cities.

Before you can receive a California cannabis license (temporary or annual) you must provide the state with proof of local approval. Our charts in this series are intended to help you figure out whether such local approval is possible and, if so, what it takes to get it.  Please note that although we hope you will find this research useful, local cannabis zoning ordinances tend to evolve, so you will want to confirm these findings and run related due diligence, prior to taking action.

Be sure to look for additional blog posts on the remaining incorporated L.A. County cities over the coming weeks.

L.A. County has some big ideas for cannabis. But are they any good?

On Monday, Los Angeles county’s Office of Cannabis Management published draft policy recommendations that will guide the county in drafting regulations to govern both medicinal and adult-use cannabis businesses in the unincorporated regions of L.A. county. Although these policies are not final, they will surely influence the drafters of the county’s forthcoming regulations. L.A. county plans to release official regulations in early 2018. News from the county comes a week and a half after the City of L.A. approved its regulations to govern medicinal and adult-use cannabis businesses (though questions remain about actual implementation).

From June 29th–August 31st of this year, the county’s Cannabis Advisory Group (CAG) held public hearings to discuss general issues with cannabis regulation, covering topics that included youth access and exposure, public health and safety, personal cultivation, all license types, compliance, taxation, licensing itself, equity, and economic development. The recommendations published this past Monday are based on the information shared during those public hearings.

The county plans to offer the same types of licenses as the state offers: cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, retail, microbusiness, and laboratory testing. The public hearings addressed concerns about wanting to encourage small business and local ownership, so we might see L.A. county implement those concerns by allowing and/or promoting small businesses and local owners regarding getting priority licensing processing or having a different/lower license fee structure.

Still, retail stores may be scarce in LA county. The CAG proposed that the county permit only 20 cannabis stores and 20 delivery-only services in the first 3 years of the local licensing/permitting process. Microbusinesses are included in those counts. This restriction is in response to the large amounts of illegal stores that have been operating in unincorporated L.A. county for years despite the current prohibition on all cannabis businesses. Furthermore, the county plans to phase-in non-retail cannabis businesses. There will be a maximum of 10 cultivation, 10 manufacturing, 10 distribution, and 10 laboratory testing permits for the first 3 years of implementation. With more than 1 million residents living in unincorporated L.A. county, it’s unlikely that these stringent caps will be able to fulfill county demand.

For those seeking to open a business in unincorporated L.A. county, although the regulations have not been created, it’s pretty clear from the CAG recommendations where the county will go with its ordinances. In turn, it is important to start looking at real property that meets the county’s planned zoning. The CAG recommended that retail stores be permitted in C-3 (General Commercial), C-M (Commercial Manufacturing), M-1 (Light Manufacturing), M-1.5 (Restricted Heavy Manufacturing), and M-2 (Heavy Manufacturing) zones. Cultivation, manufacturing, distribution, and microbusinesses should be allowed in M-1 (Light Manufacturing), M-1.5 (Restricted Heavy Manufacturing), and M-2 (Heavy Manufacturing) zones. Notably, the CAG proposed buffer requirements that differ from the State’s 600-foot requirement. The buffer from schools has been increased to 1,000 feet, and there would also be buffers of 600 feet from day cares, public libraries, public parks, alcohol/drug rehabs, and other cannabis stores. There would also be a buffer of 300 feet from stores that sell alcohol. Fortunately, the Department of Regional Planning released proposed locations that comply with the suggested zoning.

The proposed recommendations also discuss the potential for an equity program similar to what has been passed in the City of Los Angeles. However, there are no definitive guidelines, so it is unlikely we’ll see an equity program in the county that’s as elaborate as the City of L.A. in early 2018.

The proposed recommendations provide significant insight into where the county will likely go with its actual cannabis business regulations–stakeholders should review these policies and prepare themselves accordingly as it’s going to be a competitive county in which to run a cannabis businesses.

San Gabriel Valley Cannabis LawsOur Los Angeles cannabis lawyers (of which I am one) are constantly being asked about the cannabis laws of various of the 88 incorporated cities in Los Angeles County.

Because it is both important and difficult to decipher each individual city’s local laws, we thought it would be helpful to provide you with charts to help. We divided the county into 4 regions and we will over the next few weeks trickle out the charts for each of these regions to keep you updated on each of the cities and their current laws. Part 1 was The Cannabis Laws of Los Angeles County: The 24 Cities in the Westside/South Bay Region (310).

This week’s post highlights the cities located in and around the San Gabriel Valley. Here is the chart showing the laws pertaining to cultivation, dispensing, distribution, and manufacturing in San Gabriel Valley Cities.

Before you can receive a California cannabis license you must have proof of local approval. Our charts in this series are intended to help you figure out whether such local approval is possible and, if so, what it takes to get it. Look for additional blog posts on remaining LA incorporated cities over the next few weeks.

 

The cannabis laws of the Cities of Los Angeles CountyOur Los Angeles cannabis lawyers (of which I am one) are constantly being asked about the cannabis laws of various of the 88 incorporated cities in Los Angeles County.

Because it is both important and difficult to decipher each individual city’s local laws, we thought it would be helpful to provide you with charts to help. We divided the county into 4 regions and we will over the next few weeks trickle out the charts for each of these regions to keep you updated on each of the cities and their current laws.

Here is what’s going on in the 24 cities located in the Westside/South Bay Region of Los Angeles:

City Dispensing Cultivating Manufacturing Distributing Pending Changes
Avalon

No

Medical marijuana dispensaries are prohibited in the city.

No

Cultivation of marijuana shall be considered a prohibited use in all zoning districts of the city.

Silent Silent City council met 10/3/17 to discuss considering regulating cannabis. Recommended council direct city attorney develop an ordinance to regulate cannabis.
Beverly Hills

No

Commercial cannabis activity (profit or not-for-profit) is prohibited in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activity (profit or not-for-profit) is prohibited in the city. Exception for personal cultivation of 6 or fewer plants.

No

Commercial cannabis activity (profit or not-for-profit) is prohibited in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activity (profit or not-for-profit) is prohibited in the city.

City adopted an ordinance on 8/8/17 expressly prohibiting all forms of cannabis-related business in the city, with the exception of medical marijuana delivery to residents.
Carson

No

Municipal code explicitly prohibits medical marijuana dispensaries.

Silent Silent Silent On 11/8/16 the city passed Measure KK which would impose a tax on cannabis business activity. Also, the city council has been meeting to address allowing cannabis business activities, but nothing is certain yet. Scheduled to have an ordinance in effect by 12/7/17.
Compton

No

Commercial cannabis activities of any type or nature are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Cultivation of cannabis for commercial or non-commercial purposes, including cultivation by a qualified patient or primary caregiver, is expressly prohibited in all zones. Does not apply to the personal cultivation of up to 6 plants.

No

Currently, a moratorium is in place for the establishment of all commercial medical marijuana uses in the city.

No

Currently, a moratorium is in place for the establishment of all commercial medical marijuana uses in the city.

Emergency ordinance issuing a moratorium on cannabis activities is currently in place. City council has directed the city attorney prepare a report on effect and impact of proposed marijuana initiative.
Culver City

Silent

The municipal code makes no mention of cannabis.

Silent Silent Silent On 9/11/17 the city council met to consider recommendations from marijuana task force to permit commercial cannabis activity in the city and directed staff to return with proposed ordinances that would allow manufacturing and distribution. Staff recommendation is to allow retail, cultivation, manufacturing, distributing, and laboratory testing.
El Segundo

No

No license can be issued for, nor shall any person operate a retail marijuana store, marijuana establishment, or any commercial marijuana activity in the city.

No

No license can be issued for, nor shall any person operate a marijuana cultivation facility, marijuana establishment, or any commercial marijuana activity in the city. Cultivation for personal use is permitted of not more than 6 plants.

No

No license can be issued for, nor shall any person operate a marijuana product manufacturing facility, marijuana establishment, or any commercial marijuana activity in the city.

No

No license can be issued for, nor shall any person operate a marijuana testing facility, marijuana establishment, or any commercial marijuana activity in the city.

Planning commission is held a study session on 10/12/17 with city staff to discuss new state marijuana laws and to recommend the city council approve an ordinance regulating marijuana-related land uses.
Gardena

No

Commercial marijuana activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial marijuana activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city. Personal cultivation is permitted.

No

Commercial marijuana activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial marijuana activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

Planning commission recommended council to approve an ordinance that will prohibit all commercial cannabis activity within the city on 9/5/17.
Hawthorne

No

Marijuana dispensaries are prohibited in all zones of the city (ordinance approved 1/26/17).

No

Marijuana cultivation is prohibited in all zones of the city (ordinance approved 1/26/17).

No

Marijuana processing is prohibited in all zones of the city (ordinance approved 1/26/17).

Silent No mention in city council meetings since issued ordinance 1/26/17.
Hermosa Beach

No

Marijuana dispensaries are prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

No

Marijuana cultivation is prohibited in all zones within the city. No person shall cultivate any amount of cannabis in the city.

No

No person shall establish, operate, conduct, or allow commercial cannabis activity anywhere in the city. Definition of commercial cannabis activity includes manufacture and processing.

No

No person shall establish, operate, conduct, or allow commercial cannabis activity anywhere in the city. Definition of commercial cannabis activity includes distribution.

Staff recommended city council provide direction for preparing an ordinance banning or regulating sale, manufacture, cultivation, and delivery of adult-use cannabis and residential cultivation of cannabis on 9/12/17 (no action has been taken).
Inglewood

No

The sale or dispensing of marijuana for medical purposes or otherwise at any medical marijuana dispensary is prohibited in all zones.

No

Any use involved in the sale, possession, cultivation, use and/or distribution of marijuana for medical purposes is prohibited in all zones.

Silent

No

Any use involved in the sale, possession, cultivation, use and/or distribution of marijuana for medical purposes is prohibited in all zones.

Staff recommended council amend the zoning code to prohibit all commercial activity associated with cannabis production, transport and dispensing in all zones on 9/26/17.
Lawndale

No

Marijuana dispensaries are expressly prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

No

Marijuana cultivation is prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

No

Marijuana manufacturing is not a permitted use and is prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

No

Marijuana distribution is not a permitted use and is prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

On 5/1/17 the city council adopted an ordinance that prohibits all commercial marijuana uses that may be authorized under Prop. 64.
Lomita

No

Commercial cannabis activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activities of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

None since municipal code updated on 2/2/2016 by prohibiting commercial cannabis activities 2/2/16.
Los Angeles

No

It is unlawful to operate, establish, own, use or permit the establishment or operation of a medical marijuana business in the city (unless already established prior to Sept. 2007).

No

It is unlawful to operate, establish, own, use or permit the establishment or operation of a medical marijuana business in the city (unless already established prior to Sept. 2007).

No

It is unlawful to operate, establish, own, use or permit the establishment or operation of a medical marijuana business in the city (unless already established prior to Sept. 2007).

No

It is unlawful to operate, establish, own, use or permit the establishment or operation of a medical marijuana business in the city (unless already established prior to Sept. 2007).

Currently waiting on the city council to approve regulations under Measure M to  allow all commercial marijuana businesses of all types.
Lynwood

No

Marijuana dispensaries are prohibited in all zoning districts.

Yes

Marijuana cultivation related businesses are permitted in the Manufacturing Zone.

Yes

Marijuana manufacturing related businesses are permitted in the Manufacturing Zone.

Silent

Do allow a transporter to carry or move cannabis within the city if comply with State law.

Council allowing approval of development agreements for permits to operate cultivation and/or manufacturing facilities in the city.
Malibu

Yes

Medical marijuana dispensaries are permitted.

Silent Silent Silent On 2/22/16 city council directed staff to prepare ordinance limiting dispensaries and provide options for regulating commercial cultivation (no results yet).
Manhattan Beach

No

Medical marijuana dispensaries are prohibited.

No

Indoor and outdoor cultivation of marijuana for commercial or non-commercial purposes is expressly prohibited.

No

Commercial medical marijuana activities of any type or nature are expressly prohibited in the city. Definition of commercial medical marijuana activities includes manufacture and processing.

No

Commercial medical marijuana activities of any type or nature are expressly prohibited in the city. Definition of commercial medical marijuana activities includes distribution.

On 9/13/17 the planning commission held a public hearing to decide whether to recommend the city council adopt an ordinance prohibiting commercial cannabis activity in the city.
Palos Verdes Estates

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types are expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Marijuana cultivation is prohibited in all zones within the city’s jurisdictional limits.

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

City council has met to amend an ordinance to allow certain types of cultivation.
Rancho Palos Verdes

Silent

 

No

Code explicitly prohibits marijuana cultivation.

Silent

 

Silent

 

No action since cultivation prohibition was instituted.
Redondo Beach

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city. Dispensaries of medical cannabis are expressly prohibited in all zones throughout the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city. Cultivation of medical cannabis for non-commercial purposes is prohibited in all zones.

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

No

Commercial cannabis activity of all types is expressly prohibited in all zones in the city.

Planning commission held a public hearing on 7/20/17 to amend zoning ordinance to continue to prohibit recreational commercial cannabis businesses, but allow delivery of medical cannabis.
Rolling Hills

Silent

 

Silent

 

Silent

 

Silent

 

Planning commission held a public hearing on 9/19/17 to consider banning all commercial cannabis activities, except allowing for delivery of medical cannabis and regulating personal cultivation.
Rolling Hills Estates

No

Medical marijuana dispensaries are expressly prohibited.

No

The establishment or operation of a marijuana cultivation facility is prohibited within the city limits.

No

All commercial cannabis activity within the city is prohibited.

No

All commercial cannabis activity within the city is prohibited.

No mention since code updated 2/23/16.
Santa Monica

Yes

Allows for 2 medical marijuana dispensaries in city. Staff anticipates selection process for 2 will be in early 2018 (no timelines available until 10/24/17).

Silent

 

Silent

 

Silent

 

City council had study session on 3/7/17 to review options for allowing manufacturing of cannabis products that do not use volatile solvents. Expect ordinance regulating cannabis soon.
Torrance

No

Dispensaries of medical cannabis are expressly prohibited in the city.

No

Cultivation of medical cannabis is expressly prohibited in the city.

No

All commercial cannabis activity within the city is prohibited.

No

All commercial cannabis activity within the city is prohibited.

City council adopted an urgency ordinance establishing a temporary moratorium on marijuana uses on 6/27/17. On 8/8/17 council held a public hearing to consider extending the ban through December 2017.
West Hollywood

Yes

Municipal code expressly allows medical marijuana collectives.

Silent

 

Silent

 

Silent

 

At 8/21/17 meeting council supported staff’s recommendations to allow dispensaries, cultivation, manufacturing, and testing. On 10/5/17 planning commission held a public hearing to consider a recommendation to council to amend the code to regulate cannabis-related land uses allowed under state law.