washington state cannabis law marijuana lawOn Thursday, President Trump’s Press Secretary Sean Spicer predicted “increased enforcement” against recreational cannabis. By Friday, Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson was promising Washington State would “resist any efforts by the Trump administration to undermine the will of the voters in Washington state.”

Washington State AG Ferguson’s office also tweeted  the following:

 I was deeply disappointed to hear the White House Press Secretary’s comment today regarding marijuana legalization by states like Washington.

Last week [Washington State] Governor Inslee joined me in sending a letter to Attorney General Sessions, asking for a meeting on this issue. I look forward to sharing how our state’s approach is working.

I will also be very clear with AG Sessions that I will defend the will of Washington voters. My office will use every tool at our disposal to ensure that the federal government does not undermine Washington’s successful, unified system for recreational and medical marijuana.

The Ferguson/Inslee letter describes how legalization in Washington State has allowed local law enforcement to use its limited resources to combat other, more serious crimes, and how legal marijuana has generated significant tax revenue for the state. Ferguson and Inslee also requested Sessions continue to uphold the the Cole Memo.

Sessions has not yet indicated how he will treat legal cannabis nor what his position will be on the Cole Memo, which essentially says the federal government will stay away from robustly regulated state-legal cannabis. Washington State has already scored a legal victory by blocking the President’s travel ban, so few view AG Ferguson’s stated intention to fight for cannabis as an idle threat.

If the Feds do seek to shut down Washington State’s highly successful recreational cannabis industry, we expect the state would argue that federal law on cannabis cannot preempt state law. Washington State would likely argue there is no conflict between Washington’s recreational laws and the federal Controlled Substances Act because the two can stand together. Washington’s recreational marijuana laws support the intent of the federal Controlled Substances Act, which is to sufficiently control and oversee scheduled narcotics.

Though Washington State will likely concede that the federal government has the power to enforce its own marijuana laws, it will likely argue that the Tenth Amendment of the Constitution prohibits the federal government from forcing Washington State to use any of its own resources to carry this out. Since Jeff Sessions concedes that marijuana enforcement is a question of “federal resources,” the more the states with legal cannabis force the federal Department of Justice to expend federal funds and resources to eradicate cannabis, the less likely it is to occur. If the federal government is serious about going after recreational marijuana in states like Washington, we should expect serious and sustained resistance from states whose citizens voted legal marijuana.

 

  • Rick1234

    If The new AG wants to fight us patients, and recreational consumers, and remain in his position, he would be wise to change his stance before we flood the WH mail office with more letters requesting the President ask for his resignation then the WH mail staff can handle. Nuff said.