California Cannabis lawsSince Proposition 64 passed last November, there has been a spike in reports of California dispensaries advertising their willingness to sell recreational cannabis to anyone 21 years and older “with only a valid ID” (i.e. physician’s recommendation not required). However, Prop 64 requires dispensaries apply for and obtain a state retailer license to sell recreational cannabis or face criminal and civil penalties for each day of illegal operations. Since the State of California has yet to issue such a license, any dispensary currently selling recreational cannabis in California is doing so illegally.

For marijuana consumers, your options are simple: (1) obtain a valid physician’s recommendation and purchase medical marijuana from a dispensary; (2) grow your own recreational marijuana at home by following local regulations; or (3) get home grown marijuana from other adults in California through a free, sharing economy.

For dispensaries, your options are even simpler: (1) sell medical marijuana legally by following local laws and securing any necessary permits or licenses; or (2) operate illegally and face severe penalties, raids, and criminal prosecution.

Dispensaries in California have been making illegal sales long before Prop 64 passed. But local law enforcement believe dispensaries have become “more emboldened” now that recreational cannabis is legal in the state. Some dispensaries might wrongly believe that any and all sales are allowed under a Prop 64 regime, but others clearly choose to operate outside of the law. This angers legal dispensary owners who pay the high costs of operating a legal business (including taxes, licensing fees, and security costs) while also waiting to profit on recreational sales after state licenses are issued.

Though Prop 64 makes clear that anyone making retail sales or deliveries of recreational cannabis must have a California state license, the challenge faced by local (and soon state) prosecutors is how to go about shutting down illegal businesses. Often when a city or county attempts to shut down an illegal dispensary, the dispensary owner just relocates the business and changes the name, resulting in an endless game of “whack-a-mole” for local authorities. But now that cannabis businesses are beginning to set their sights on state licenses, is it more important than ever to play nice with your local city and county officials as local authorization is a requirement for state licensing. Businesses caught operating illegally can be disqualified from receiving a local permit, and even if state and local authorities cannot prohibit these business from applying for a California cannabis license, past troubles with following the law will likely be a negative mark on your cannabis license application.

We also expect state and federal enforcement to pick up over the next few years. California state agencies do not currently have jurisdiction over illegal cannabis businesses, but once state licenses are issued they plan to work with local authorities to enforce the cannabis laws. Even worse, If illegal businesses continue to thrive in California, the federal government could challenge California’s entire regulatory system under the guidance of the Cole Memo. With a new federal administration coming in, and the possibility of an anti-marijuana Jeff Sessions as Attorney General, California could face even greater scrutiny. So by operating an illegal business not only do you risk your own chances at the legal market, you also risk undermining the legalization effort California strived so long to achieve.

As California transitions into a regulated legal market, the grey areas we have long been dealing with will soon shrink. In a post-Prop 64 world you can either follow the laws and obtain a license to make legal recreational sales or you can risk fines, jail time, and the loss of the chance to ever operate again.

  • Jack Glenn

    These dispensaries are not allowed to sell the recreational cannabis until January, 2018. They have to obtain the retail licenses and who knows what kind of weed are they selling. A fully regulated system is obviously safe and passes through the regular quality check. These dispensaries should be reported to the authorities