Help WantedTwo weeks ago, we wrote that the Oregon legislative session would begin this Wednesday, and that 28 proposed cannabis bills graced the legislature’s website. Since that time, we caught wind of SB 301, a tidy little bill that would abolish the right of Oregon employers to fire their “at will” employees for off-duty cannabis use. To our knowledge, Oregon would be the first such state to take this step.

SB 301 is short, sweet and even subtle, as it refrains from mentioning the words “cannabis” or “marijuana” altogether. Instead, it amends an existing statute that prohibits an employer from mandating “that any employee or prospective employee refrain from using lawful tobacco products during non-working hours.” (Our emphasis.) Proposed SB 301 removes the “lawful tobacco products” language, and replaces it with language covering any “substance that is lawful to use under the laws of this state.” Of course, that includes pot.

Like most laws, proposed SB 301 does contain a couple of exceptions. In the first, an employer could require an employee to abstain off-hours when the restriction relates to “a bona fide occupational qualification” (think: safety). In the second exception, employers would still be free to can their employees for “the performance of work while impaired.” Obviously, this could apply to someone who dabs and then walks into work; but it could apply equally to someone who shows up high on prescription drugs, or drunk, or even hung over.

In the case of cannabis, we have written many times—here and elsewhere—about the court-tested right of employers to fire their hapless employees for off-duty use. We have also wondered aloud: why do employers even care? As it stands, Oregon is one of many states that has grappled with these issues: in a well known 2010 case, Emerald Steel v. BOLI, the Oregon State Supreme Court held that even disabled, medical marijuana card holders are not protected from the cudgel of an employer’s zero-tolerance drug policy. Other state courts have ruled similarly.

With SB 301, the Oregon legislature is doing what its citizens should expect: it is considering the effects of state-legal cannabis on peripheral laws, while looking after the civil rights of its citizens. We hope SB 301 passes in something like its present form, and we expect similar changes in other jurisdictions in the coming months and years. If an employee performs her job safely and well, off-duty cannabis use is irrelevant.

 

 

 

 

  • DC

    I hope it passes too. Great post!

  • Texxtyn

    It seems testing for legal drugs is an illegal search. How bout I come over and search for questionable books, sex toys, or whiskey. Why is it different when they “search” your bodily fluids.

  • Junior Marcial

    Every state should do this.