Oregon Cannabis lawsThis week marks the end of the early start program for medical marijuana dispensaries licensed by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA). As of Sunday, January 1, OHA licensed dispensaries will only be allowed to sell marijuana to adults who hold a valid medical marijuana card. These dispensaries will no longer be allowed to sell marijuana at retail to non-medical cardholders, as most had been doing since October 1, 2015. Going forward, only Oregon Liquor Control Commission (OLCC) licensed dispensaries can sell pot at retail to non-medical cardholders. And that is where the money is.

For the past few months, our Oregon cannabis lawyers have prodded, poked and cajoled many of our clients to submit their OLCC paperwork to ensure a timely and successful transition into the adult use market. In our experience, OLCC has prioritized retail applicants, and for anyone without local hang-ups the transition has been fairly smooth. Still, the OLCC reports that just 104 of 494 retail applicants have been licensed to date. (The numbers for processors are even worse, with just 23 of 208 applicants approved.)

If you are an OLCC licensed retailer, you will be sitting pretty on January 1, assuming you can find product to sell while everyone else scrambles toward licensure. The situation is less than ideal for consumers, who will no longer have access to many outlets, and also less than ideal for the State of Oregon, which could see a hiccup in sales tax revenues. We have written that the rollout of state level cannabis programs is an uneven course, and hard deadlines tend to showcase that observation.

Note that although the January 1 deadline may seem to decouple Oregon’s medical and adult use marijuana programs, the reality is more nuanced. OLCC licensed entities are allowed to opt in to medical marijuana activity, and almost all of them do – whether through production, processing or retailing. In the retail context, this means that OLCC licensees will be allowed to sell marijuana to medical marijuana cardholders along with anyone else (but tax-free), subject to tracking and reporting requirements. A year from now, we expect very few OHA dispensaries will be standing.

The Oregon early sales program was a good idea, and we believe it achieved its goal of diminishing black market sales. It is our hope that the testing bottleneck and a lack of licensed OLCC operators will not reverse that trend. In any case, starting January 1, Oregon dispensaries without an OLCC license will face a $500 fine, per violation, for selling to retail customers. All of this should make for an interesting start to 2017.

 

  • frank walters

    This is good but threatening to marijuana retail marketers.