Oregon cannabis laws

We recently discussed proposed legislation to prevent Oregon marijuana retailers from recording, retaining, or transferring any information “that may be used to identify a consumer,” such as a consumer’s name, birthday or address. Some marijuana retailers had been collecting and storing this information for marketing purposes, often without their customers’ knowledge. The Oregon legislature was concerned that this practice would create a paper trail the federal government could use against cannabis consumers in a federal crackdown on recreational marijuana.

As we predicted, the legislature moved quickly. Yesterday, Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed SB 863 into law less than two months after the bill was introduced. In a strong signal to Oregon’s marijuana businesses and consumers, the bill enjoyed broad bipartisan support and passed the Oregon Senate by a vote of 21-6 and the Oregon House by a margin of 53-5. The bill requires all Oregon recreational marijuana retailers to destroy existing customer personal information within 30 days and it prevents cannabis retailers from collecting personal information in the future without the customers’ informed consent.

The bill is an explicit response to the Trump administration’s recent comments calling for a crackdown on the recreational marijuana industry and it is widely viewed as part of Governor Brown’s commitment to protect Oregon’s marijuana consumers from federal intervention or harm. SB 863’s streamlined journey from bill to law was helped by Section 4 of the bill, which declared that the Trump administration’s regressive statements regarding marijuana legalization have created a state of emergency requiring immediate action to preserve the public peace, health and safety.

Oregon’s consumers can now rest a bit easier, knowing their local retailer will not be maintaining a database of personal information to which an unfriendly federal government may someday have access.