Cannabis Marijuana legalization

Imagine that. An American politician speaking clearly and reasonably and sensibly about cannabis, or about anything for that matter.

Representative Curbelo makes a very good point. From both a business and a legal standpoint, it makes no sense to prohibit legal marijuana businesses from doing business properly and at the same time denying them the same tax deductions as other businesses.

It is unfair and wrong and it must and will change.

 

Last week, Canna Law Blog’s Hilary Bricken and Matt Maurer of Canada Cannabis Legal put on a webinar on the laws that impact  the cannabis businesses in the United States and Canada. This webinar covered the medical and recreational cannabis markets of the United States and Canada, investment considerations, cross-border legal issues, and opportunities for companies and individuals looking to invest in the US or Canada cannabis industries. For those of you not able to attend this event live, we provide you with the recorded version below.

Enjoy!

montel

Montel Williams provides a good reminder here. The cannabis industry is taking off in a big way and that includes both medical and recreational cannabis. But in the midst of the excitement so many of us feel about the positive changes we are seeing, we should not forget those who have been fighting this fight for decades, and as Williams states, many of these cannabis leaders have been patients who need medicine. Though we are of the strong view that recreational needs make no apologies, we believe with equal strength that it is important to give patients access to medical-grade cannabis at accessible costs.

In addition to building a cannabis industry that maintains accessibility for patients, we also need to keep pushing until medical cannabis is federally legal. As of April 2017, twenty-nine of the United States have legalized some form of medical marijuana, and many states have medical programs in the works. Though this means more than half the country has some sort of medical program, many of those programs are quite limited in terms of access and reach and it also means there are still many with no legal access at all. What kind of country denies medicine to someone based on the crazy notion that the government should be able to deny access to something as harmless as cannabis?

What more can we all do to open up the cannabis industry even further? Please tell us.

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On June 1st, from 12-1:30 p.m. Pacific, three of our Los Angeles and San Francisco attorneys, Hilary Bricken, Alison Malsbury, and Habib Bentaleb, will present a free webinar on the initial MCRSA rules, which were released on April 28, 2017 and now make up the bulk of the regulatory standards for California cannabis licensing.

The speakers will give an in-depth analysis of these new rules and give you the knowledge you need to secure a medical cannabis business license from the State of California when January 1, 2018 comes around.

This webinar will cover cannabis licensing issues for:

In addition to these topics, the presenters will take audience questions both during and at the end of the webinar.

To register for this free event plese go here.

We look forward to your attendance.

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Tomorrow at 9 am Pacific (12 p.m. Eastern), Matt Maurer, Chair of the Cannabis Law Group at Minden Gross, LLP and author of Canada Cannabis Legal  will team up with Canna Law Blog’s own Hilary Bricken to provide a free webinar on the cannabis laws that impact cannabis industries of both the United States and Canada.

Though medical marijuana is legal in Canada, it remains federally illegal in the United States. Over half of the United States has legalized medical cannabis, and eight of the states have legalized recreational marijuana for adults 21 and up.

This webinar will cover the following:

  • The Medical and recreational cannabis market of the United States
  • The Medical and (potential) recreational cannabis market in Canada
  • Investment considerations
  • Cross border legal issues
  • Opportunities for companies and individuals looking to invest in the US or Canada cannabis industries
  • Questions posed from the audience

You can register for this free event here. We look forward to seeing you there!

 

Cannabis politicians

We are indeed in the midst of an opiate-related public health crisis, but aside from that, Chris Christie is full of “baloney.” First those in favor of cannabis legalization are not exclusively liberals by any means. And the liberals who favor legalization are not crazy, and their reasons for supporting cannabis have nothing to do with “wanting “to say everything’s OK.” They simply see the benefits, such as increased tax revenue, decreased unemployment, disempowering of the drug cartels, and — most importantly — the end of people (far too often the disenfranchised) being arrested for consuming something that has never killed anyone.

We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: cannabis is NOT a partisan issue. It’s an everyone issue and those like Chris Christie who state otherwise are simply throwing around empty rhetoric to serve their own means. It’s classic divide and conquer. We need our authorities and our politicians to look at the evidence because regardless of whether you personally want to use cannabis and regardless of where you sit on the political spectrum, cannabis legalization makes sense. There’s just no way around it.

What do you think?

joycelyne

This sensible, respectful quote from Former Surgeon General Elders is the exact type of statement we should be able to expect from those in positions of power. Her statement is based on scientific evidence showing cannabis can and does relieve the symptoms of multiple diseases such as those Elders describes above. Statements such as these and the evidence that supports them is the exact reason over half of the states have legalized medical marijuana and why well over half the population believes in its legalization.

Because it’s medicine. Medicine that works. Not for everyone and not for everything, sure. But certainly enough so that people ought to be able to decide for themselves whether to consume or not. Let’s keep fighting, not only for cannabis, but for responsible evidence-based statements from our authorities as well.

Cannabis attorneys

This past week — in the grand tradition of Trump Administration flip-flopping — DHS Secretary John Kelly changed his mind on pot. Kelly initially stood out as moderate on cannabis when he earlier in the week declared that “marijuana is not a factor in the drug war.” This statement led us to believe he had a somewhat more realistic view on cannabis than the rest of his cannabis hating colleagues. Give his quote above, that is no longer the case and it appears Kelly’s views mimic the Reefer Madness and D.A.R.E. ideologies we have come to expect from so many in the Trump Administration.

What do you see the Trump Administration actually doing about cannabis, beyond just voicing stupid opinions on it?

 

Cannabis lawyers and marijuana lawyers

Sherrilyn Ifill made the above comment earlier this week in response to Jeff Sessions’ recently praising drug enforcement policies of the 80s and 90s. According to Sessions, the drug prevention campaigns from those eras deserve applause for “telling the terrible truth about drugs.” But as has become absolutely typical for Mr. Sessions, he ignores the facts. Sessions fails to acknowledge that these abstinence-focused campaigns were both dreadfully expensive and a complete failure. Not surprisingly, Sessions also fails to mention how they increased imprisonment for drug-related crimes and disproportionately targeted people of color and the poor. Sessions’ also sloppily but deliberately lumps cannabis in with drugs like heroin, willfully ignoring that cannabis can be used medicinally and is not chemically addictive and is therefore — at least for anyone who looks at things at all objectively — very different.

Sessions wants to turn back time and employ ineffective and outdated drug enforcement policies and his reasons for wanting to start a new war on drugs are probably no different from Richard Nixon, who started that war to increase racial divides and thus scare white people into voting for him and his cronies (remember, Sessions was at one time deemed too racist to be a federal judge). No matter what the reason for Jeff Sessions’ by now perpetual hatred for marijuana and his aversion to telling the truth about it, our job as citizens is to resist. We probably already are at the point where Sessions’ statements will have little more impact than coyotes howling at the moon, but the more states that legalize, the more we can be sure that will be the case. We must continue pushing forward until cannabis is legalized all across the country and then we can merely laugh or ignore comments from people like Sessions.

Cannabis business webinar On May 9, 2017 at 9 am Pacific (12 p.m. Eastern), Canna Law Blog’s Hilary Bricken will team up with Matt Maurer, Chair of the Cannabis Law Group at Minden Gross, LLP and author of Canada Cannabis Legal , to present a webinar to provide a primer on the cannabis laws that impact cannabis industries in both countries.

Though medical marijuana is legal in Canada, it remains federally illegal in the United States. Eight states in the United States have legalized marijuana for adults 21 and up, and even more have legalized marijuana for medical use. Canada has yet to take on recreational legalization, though it is expected to do so in 2018.

This webinar will focus on the cannabis laws of both countries, and in particular how they interact for those interested in investing across the US-Canada border. We will cover the following:

  • Medical and recreational cannabis market of the United States
  • Medical and (potential) recreational cannabis market in Canada
  • Investment considerations
  • Cross border legal issues
  • Opportunities for companies and individuals looking to invest in the US and/or Canada
  • Questions posed from the audience

You can register for this free event here.

Should you have questions, please feel free to write to us at firm@harrisbricken.com.